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#Bookreview #RBRT THE SILENT KOOKABURRA by Liza Perrat (@LizaPerrat) Australia from the point of view of a child with an edge of creepiness and intrigue #TuesdayBookBlog

Hi all:

As you know, apart from my own reading and the books that authors kindly offer me for review, I review for some groups. Today I bring you one of the books I’ve reviewed for Rosie’s Book Review Team. If you’re a reviewer, I recommend you check her out as she always gets fantastic books and she’s very well organised.

Here it is:

Cover of the Silent Kookaburra by Liza Perrat
The Silent Kookaburra by Liza Perrat

The Silent Kookaburra by Liza Perrat
All eleven-year-old Tanya Randall wants is a happy family. But Mum does nothing besides housework, Dad’s always down the pub and Nanna Purvis moans at everyone except her dog. Then Shelley arrives –– the miracle baby who fuses the Randall family in love for their little gumnut blossom.

Tanya’s life gets even better when she meets an uncle she didn’t know she had. He tells her she’s beautiful and could be a model. Her family refuses to talk about him. But that’s okay, it’s their little secret.

Then one blistering summer day tragedy strikes, and the surrounding mystery and suspicion tear apart this fragile family web.

Embracing the social changes of 1970s Australia, against a backdrop of native fauna and flora, The Silent Kookaburra is a haunting exploration of the blessings, curses and tyranny of memory.

Unsettling psychological suspense blending the intensity of Wally Lamb with the atmosphere of Peter James, this story will get under your skin.

My review:

I write this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team and I was provided with an ARC copy that I voluntarily chose to review.

The story —set in an Australia richly brought to life by the writing that describes landscape, animals, trees, food, furniture, cars, lifestyle and social mores— is told in the first person by Tanya Randall. Adult Tanya is back in her childhood cottage and a newspaper cutting from 1973, which her grandmother kept, makes her remember that time when she was only eleven. The story of adult Tanya frames that of her childhood memories, which take up most of the book (I had almost forgotten that fact until the very end of the story).

Young Tanya is quite innocent (of course, she doesn’t think so), overweight (she eats compulsively, seemingly to comfort herself when the situation gets difficult at home, when they call her names, when she has any upsets or… most of the time. There are long lists of biscuits and other foods she consumes at an alarming pace, well-researched for the period, although I’m not familiar with them), and loves her mother, father, cat (that she insists on walking as if it were a dog, even if that brings her even more unwanted attention), dog, true crime magazines, and her friend Angelina, although not so much her grandmother, Nanna Purvis.

Seeing (or reading) things from a child’s point of view is a good way to reflect on how adult behaviour might appear to children and how difficult certain things might be to process and understand. Her mother’s miscarriages and depression (that keeps getting missed until very late in the novel), her secret uncle’s devious behaviour (it’s hard to read the scenes of Tanya with her uncle, as she’s clearly craving for attention and we know from early on where things are headed, but Tanya doesn’t and she finds it more and more difficult to extricate herself from the situation). The author is excellent at making us share her point of view and her thought processes that create an atmosphere of dread and impending disaster. The dualistic life view of young children, for whom everything is black or white is reflected perfectly in Tanya’s reactions to her grandmother (whom at first she doesn’t like at all but later, as she realises she’s the only one to stick by her, goes on to become complicit with) and to her uncle, who goes from being perfect to being a monster (although the novel suggests that he had also been a victim).

The novel is not easy to classify, although it comes under the thriller label, but it is a psychological exploration of childhood, memory, tragedy, the lies we tell ourselves, and also a work of historical (albeit recent history) fiction, as it beautifully recreates the time and place (down details such as hit songs, records of the era, bicycles, toys, cars, magazines, foodstuffs, clothing and hairdos) and even historical events, like the opening of the Sidney Opera House. There is something of a twist at the end, and plenty of secrets, like in most domestic noir novels, but for me, the strong points are the way the story is told, and some of the characters. Nanna Purvis (who is a fantastic character and proves that grandmothers are almost always right) has old-fashioned ideas about relationships, sexuality, religion and race, but manages to surprise us and has good insight into her own family. Tanya reminded me of myself at her age (although I read other types of books, I was also overweight and wasn’t the most popular girl at school, and we also lived with my mother’s mother, although thankfully my home circumstances were not as tragic) and she tries hard to keep her family together. Her point of view and her understanding are limited, and her actions and frame of mind repetitive at times (she munches through countless packets of biscuits, pulls at her cowlick often, bemoans the unattractive shape of her ears, wonders if she’s adopted) as it befits a character of her age and historical period (so close but yet so far. No internet, no social media, no easy way to access information). Real life is not a succession of exciting events; even at times of crisis, most of our lives are taken up by routine actions and everyday tasks. Her mother’s sinking into depression and her bizarre behaviour, which is sadly misunderstood and left untreated for far too long, rang a chord with me as a psychiatrist. It is an accurate portrayal of such conditions, of the effect the illness can have not only on the sufferers but also on the family, and of the reactions of the society to such illnesses (especially at the time). Uncle Blackie is also a fascinating character but I won’t say anything else as I want to avoid spoilers. Although the setting and the atmosphere are very different, it brought to my mind some of Henry James’s stories, in particular, What Maisie Knew and The Turn of the Screw.

This is a great novel that I recommend to those who are interested in accurate psychological portrayals, reflections on the nature of memory, and books with a strong sense of setting and historical period, rather than fast action and an ever changing plot. A word of warning: it will be difficult to read for those with a low tolerance for stories about child abuse and bullying. If you’re a fan of good writing that submerges you into a time and place and plunges you inside of a character’s head, with an edge of creepiness and intrigue, this is your book.

Links:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01MTV05MN/

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MTV05MN/

And here a bit about the author:

Author Liza Perrat
Author Liza Perrat

Liza Perrat

Liza grew up in Wollongong, Australia, where she worked as a general nurse and midwife for fifteen years.
When she met her French husband on a Bangkok bus, she moved to France, where she has been living with her husband and three children for twenty years. She works part-time as a French-English medical translator, and as a novelist.
Several of her short stories have won awards, notably the Writers Bureau annual competition of 2004 and her stories have been published widely in anthologies and small press magazines. Her articles on French culture and tradition have been published in international magazines such as France Magazine and France Today.

Spirit of Lost Angels is the first in the historical “The Bone Angel” series set against a backdrop of rural France during the French Revolution. The second in the series, Wolfsangel, set during the WWII German Occupation of France, was published in October, 2013. The third in the series, Blood Rose Angel, set during the 14th century Black Plague years was published in November, 2015.

The Silent Kookaburra, a dark psychological suspense novel set in 1970s Australia, was published in November, 2016.

Friends, Family and Other Strangers From Downunder is a collection of 14 humorous, horrific and entertaining short stories set in Australia, for readers everywhere.

Liza is a co-founder and member of Triskele Books, an independent writers’ collective with a commitment to quality and a strong sense of place, and also reviews books for Bookmuse.

Liza is available for virtual book club visits (via Skype) upon request.

Amazon author page:

https://www.amazon.com/Liza-Perrat/e/B008385OF2/

Thanks to the author and to Rosie Amber for this opportunity, to you all for reading and remember to like, share, comment and CLICK! Happy reading!

By OlgaNunez

I was born in Barcelona and after living in the UK for many years have now returned home. I teach English, volunteer at Sants 3 Ràdio, a local radio station, I'm a writer, translator (English-Spanish and vice-versa) and I'm a medical doctor and worked in Forensic Psychiatry many years. I also have a BA and a PhD in American Literature and Film, and a Masters in Criminology. I've always loved books and apart from writing them I review them often.
I write a bit of everything, check my books for more information and my about page for links.
My blog is bilingual, English and Spanish.

26 replies on “#Bookreview #RBRT THE SILENT KOOKABURRA by Liza Perrat (@LizaPerrat) Australia from the point of view of a child with an edge of creepiness and intrigue #TuesdayBookBlog”

You are a genius at finding completely different and fascinating sounding books to review, Olga. This sounds like a wonderful read and I shall definitely keep it in mind for the upcoming Easter holiday.

Thanks, Robbie. Rosie Amber always manages to find interesting books in all kinds of genres too, and once you read other members of the team’s reviews it’s difficult to resist. I’d recommend joining to anybody who likes to read and reviews regularly. This book appealed to me from the time I read the description and it was a good hunch. A fantastic read. 🙂

Thanks, Erika. I try and read about a variety of things but I do find intriguing-sounding stories tend to catch my attention very often. And, you’re a good one to talk. Now singing, playing, writing, inspiring… Have a great day!

This sounds very good. Something about an Australian setting always adds a sense of the unknown for me too.
Good luck to Liza. This sounds like a compelling read.
Best wishes, Pete.

You’re right, Pete, about the Australian setting, and it this novel the heat, the background plays a very important part. I think this would make a fabulous TV adaptation (there’s too much story for a movie).

I have never visited Australia, so its very differences to Europe always make it that bit more interesting for me. That’s why I like Australian films so much.

Such a well thought out review, Olga – and you’re so right about that ‘so near yet so far’ thing. I must be the same age as Tanya – I was 12 in 1971, and sometimes it seems like a hundred years ago!

Thank, Terry. Your review of this book is fantastic and I trust your criteria. I remember talking to colleagues about children’s shows and food of the era and they’d often forget I was Spanish and didn’t know anything about it (well, some of the shows made it to Spain but the foods… definitely not). It’s weird to think how much things have changed in such a short time. 🙂

[…] he leído y reseñado una novela de Liza Perrat, en inglés, la fabulosa The Silent Kookaburra (La Kookaburra silenciosa) y cuando se presentó la oportunidad, no me pude resistir a leer otra novela de esta autora. Al […]

It is a fantastic book, Debby. I know it was a strong favorite among many of the reviewer’s in Rosie’s team, and I’ve gone on to read the author’s historical fiction and loved it too.

You won’t be sorry. Fantastic. The only problem is the risk of getting hooked on the author’s books. But well… What’s life without risk? ♥

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