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#Bookreview Images of the Past: The British Seaside By Lucinda Gosling (@penswordbooks) Oh, I like to be beside the seaside. And I love this book! #photographs

Hi all:

Recently I’ve had not had much time to read and there are not as many reviews coming at you (I’m sure you’ll be relieved to hear that), but this one is a visual feast and I had to bring it to you.

Images of the Past. The British Seaside by Lucinda Gosling
Images of the Past. The British Seaside by Lucinda Gosling

Images of the Past: The British Seaside By Lucinda Gosling 
Imprint: Pen & Sword History
Series: Images of the Past
Pages: 189
ISBN: 9781473862159
Published: 15th May 2017

Drawing on the archives of Mary Evans Picture Library, ‘Images of the Past – The British Seaside’ is a nostalgic promenade through the history of Britain’s seaside resorts from their early genesis as health destinations to their glorious, mid-20th century heyday, subsequent decline and recent regeneration.

British coastal resorts developed during a period of vast expansion and social change. Within a century, the bathing phenomenon changed from a cautiously modest immersion in the sea to a pastime that prompted the building of vast art deco temples dedicated to the cult of swimming. Once quiet fishing villages mushroomed into bustling seafronts with every conceivable amusement and facility to entice visitors and secure their loyalty for future visits. Where transport to the coast may have once been via coach and horses or boat, soon thousands of working class day-trippers flooded seaside towns, arriving by the rail network that had so quickly transformed the British landscape. This fascinating book follows these shifts and changes from bathing machines to Butlins holiday camps, told through a compelling mix of photographs, cartoons, illustrations and ephemera with many images previously unpublished.

Covering every aspect of the seaside experience whether swimming and sunbathing or sand castles and slot machines ‘The British Seaside’ reveals the seaside’s traditions, rich heritage and unique character in all its sandy, sunny, fun-packed glory.

In the press!

As featured by;

  • The Sun – Charming vintage photos show the bliss of a traditional British seaside holiday from donkey rides and sandcastles to ice-cream treats on the beach

 

  • Mirror – Seaside holiday snaps from bygone age show how bikinis, animals and health and safety on beach has changed

 

  • Mail Online – Nostalgic pictures show Britain’s love of a beach holiday before the age of budget airlines lured us to sunnier destinations

 

  • Daily Express – Vintage snaps of Great British holidays: Pictures from 1930s Butlin’s to Bournemouth beach
Author Lucinda Gosling
Author Lucinda Gosling

About the author

Lucinda Gosling studied history at the University of Liverpool and has worked in the picture library for 23 years, most recently at historical specialist, Mary Evans Picture Library. She is a writer and public speaker, contributing to various publications including History Today, Tatler and Majesty and is author of over ten books on a wide variety of subjects from historic London to Great War knitting. (Yes, I had to check and add the link. How could I possibly resist?)

She lives in Wanstead, East London with her husband, three children and a cat called Cholmondeley.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lucinda-Gosling/e/B001JP2GD4/

My review:

My thanks to Pen & Sword for offering me a copy of this book that I freely (and gladly) chose to review.

I discovered Pen & Sword thanks to a writer I had met through blogging and I am regularly kept informed of their new books through their catalogues. Although I don’t have the time to read as many of them as I would like, when I saw this one, I could not resist.

I am not British but I have lived in the UK for almost twenty-five years now. As luck would have it, my first job in the UK was in Eastbourne, and I spent quite a few years in that part of the UK (working in Eastbourne, Hastings, and later studying at Sussex University and living in Brighton for a while). Although my experiences of the British seaside are fairly recent in comparison to the pictures in this book, I am fascinated by the peculiarities of the British seaside. And, over the years, I have listened to many conversations and stories of childhood holidays and memories of happy times spent at a seaside resort or other.  When I saw this book I thought it would be fun, and a perfect way to put images to the stories I had heard and to learn new ones.

Lucinda Gosling, the author, works for the Mary Evans Picture Library (check their website here) and she has done a fantastic job of curating a great variety of images, ranging from personal photographs to postcards and advertisements, from the very late XIX century to the 1960s and 70s. They are mostly in black and white (although there are the odd colour picture and some old hand-coloured ones, some in wonderful sepia, and some colour illustrations) and they go from the funny amateur pic  taken at an amusement fair to some truly beautiful professional pictures (like some by Roger Mayne or Shirley Baker).

There is little text, other than an introduction to each part of the book, which is divided thematically into six chapters, and brief notes to identify the pictures (and on some occasions, to add a bit of background).  Although concise, the writing is excellent, as it manages to be informative, entertaining, and at times truly humorous. There is a great picture of a man (probably in his early forties, in my opinion pretty formally dressed, although he’s not wearing a jacket, so it’s probably rather informal for the period, as it is dated 1911). The description of the picture is as follows:

A relaxed looking chap sitting outside a tent at the Lucas Holiday Camp in Norbreck, Blackpool, 1911. The camp was a ‘summer holiday camp for young men’ and the location of the holidays taken by the wholesome-sounding ‘Health and Strength League’. It was described as ‘a camp for young men of good moral character who are willing to observe a few simple rules necessary for good order’. (p. 102) Your guess is as good as mine. 😉

The chapters cover: the beach (the increase in popularity of first, sea water, later swimming, and even later, sunbathing and tanning), entertainment (once you had all these people there, you had to keep them entertained, and although some of those complexes have disappeared, we still have Blackpool!), crowds and solitude (the touristic and less touristic places), travel and accommodation (once the railway made travelling easier, people flocked to the coast, but there had always been ways to get there, and people who saw an opportunity to set up bed and breakfast, and, of course, the wonderful Victorian hotels that grace many seaside towns), piers & promenades (I love piers and it was sad to read about how many have disappeared, but a joy to recover pictures of some of  them and learn more about their architects), and water (with its fascinating images of the Victorian bathing machines, and the fabulous changes in swimwear).

I am not sure what I could highlight, as I adored (adore, and I’m keeping it for life if I can) this book from beginning to end. I love the pictures of the early seaside tourists, dressed to the nines because it was a day out and you were supposed to wear your best clothes. There is a fabulous pic of a lady riding a tricycle from 1886 (I think it’s the oldest picture in the book), I love the pics of young children, especially those wearing knitted swimming suits. There is also a very touching picture of two young girls holding hands and looking towards the beach, blocked by barb wire during World War II. There are some fabulous images of incredible rides (I’m sure Health and Safety would have a fit), some fascinating pics of beauty contests (oh, how much those vintage swimming suits would fetch today), and much to make think those interested in social history.

I’ve been carrying the book with me and pestering everybody I’ve met, showing them some of my favourite pictures. I even talked about it on the radio programme I host (I know, I know, pictures on the radio…) at Penistone FM. Who would I recommend it to? Everybody! For some, it will bring memories, either of things they’ve experienced, or of things they’ve been told, and will help them tell their stories. For others, it will be a compelling slice of social history. If you like the seaside, you must check it out. If you’re interested in social history, you must check it out. If you love pictures and postcards, check it out. If you are intrigued by changes in fashion, transport, entertainment… check it out. If you love donkeys, check it out. Last but not least, if you want me to shut up about it, check it out.

Links:

https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Images-of-the-Past-The-British-Seaside-Paperback/p/13447

https://www.amazon.com/British-Seaside-Images-Past/dp/1473862159/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/British-Seaside-Images-Past/dp/1473862159/

Thanks very much to Pen & Sword (and especially to Alex, who always manages to locate me, wherever I go), thanks to the author for this fabulous book, thanks to all of you for reading, and remember to like, share, comment, click, and REVIEW!

By OlgaNunez

I was born in Barcelona and after living in the UK for many years have now returned home. I teach English, volunteer at Sants 3 Ràdio, a local radio station, I'm a writer, translator (English-Spanish and vice-versa) and I'm a medical doctor and worked in Forensic Psychiatry many years. I also have a BA and a PhD in American Literature and Film, and a Masters in Criminology. I've always loved books and apart from writing them I review them often.
I write a bit of everything, check my books for more information and my about page for links.
My blog is bilingual, English and Spanish.

10 replies on “#Bookreview Images of the Past: The British Seaside By Lucinda Gosling (@penswordbooks) Oh, I like to be beside the seaside. And I love this book! #photographs”

A great idea from Lucinda, and definitely one for me. I spent my youthful summers at the British seaside, all over the UK. I continued the habit into adult life, and enjoyed nothing more than a nostalgic day trip to a seaside resort, the more unchanged, the better. I still go every year on my birthday, this year it was Southwold. In September, I am going to spend five days in one of the best small seaside towns in the East, Sutton-on-Sea, Lincolnshire. I am addicted to the nostalgia of a seaside holiday, obviously.
Best wishes, Pete.

Thanks, Pete. I suspected this might be one for you and I remember some of your seaside posts. And I know how much you enjoy pictures. It is strange because although I didn’t experience the British seaside as a child, I also feel the nostalgia. A very special thing. Have a great week, Pete.

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