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#Bookreview LIFE ON THE VICTORIAN STAGE: THEATRICAL GOSSIP by Nell Darby (@nelldarby) A great resource for writers of historical fiction, historians, and people who love social history and the Victorian period #History #Victorianera

Hi all:

Today I bring another non-fiction book, and one of those that I think will be of particular interest to writers and historians (well, and to all of us who like gossip and enjoy the theatre). Here it is:

Life on the Victorian Stage: Theatrical Gossip by Nell Darby
Life on the Victorian Stage: Theatrical Gossip by Nell Darby

Life on the Victorian Stage: Theatrical Gossip by Nell Darby.

The expansion of the press in Victorian Britain meant more pages to be filled, and more stories to be found. Life on the Victorian Stage: Theatrical Gossip looks at how the everyday lives of Victorian performers and managers were used for such a purpose, with the British newspapers covering the good, the bad and the ugly side of life on the stage during the nineteenth century. Viewed through the prism of Victorian newspapers, and in particular, through their gossip columns, this book looks at the perils facing actors from financial disasters or insecurity to stalking, from libel cases to criminal trials and offers an alternative view of the Victorian theatrical profession.

This thoroughly researched and entertaining study looks at how the Victorian press covered the theatrical profession and, in particular, how it covered the misfortunes actors faced. It shows how the development of gossip columns and papers specializing in theater coverage enabled fans to gain an insight into their favorite performers’ lives that broke down the public-private divide of the stage and helped to create a very modern celebrity culture.

The book looks at how technological developments enabled the press to expose the behavior of actors overseas, such as when actor Fred Solomon’s’ bigamy in America was revealed. It looks at the pressures facing actors, which could lead to suicide, and the impact of the 1857 Matrimonial Causes Act on what the newspapers covered, with theatrical divorce cases coming to form a significant part of their coverage in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Other major events, from theater disasters to the murder of actor William Terriss, are explored within the context of press reportage and its impact. The lives of those in the theatrical profession are put into their wider social context to explore how they lived, and how they were perceived by press and public in Victorian Britain.

https://www.amazon.com/Life-Victorian-Stage-Theatrical-Gossip-ebook/dp/B074P6BRCN/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Life-Victorian-Stage-Theatrical-Gossip-ebook/dp/B074P6BRCN/

Author Nell Darby
Author Nell Darby

About the author:

In her blog, she tells us:

I am a criminal historian and freelance writer. I have a PhD in the history of crime, and also write the Criminal Historian blog.

I currently work as the editor of Your Family History magazine – you can read a bit more about my role here – and also have a monthly history column in the Stratford Heraldnewspaper. I have written for many other publications, including The GuardianOxford TimesWho Do You Think You Are?Real CrimeAll About HistoryDiscover Your Ancestors, and Runner’s World. During my PhD, I was also employed as a fact-checker for BBC History magazine, and its website, History Extra.

I have appeared on BBC Radio Oxford and BBC Radio Gloucestershire, talking about criminal history, have been interviewed by BBC Derby about Victorian mugshots, and have also been interviewed for the Who Do You Think You Are? podcast. I also review books for magazines and academic journals, including  The London JournalJournal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Archives & Records.

I am the author of two books on the history of crime – Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in the Cotswolds (Pen & Sword, 2009), and Olde Cotswold Punishments (The History Press, 2011). My latest book, Life On The Victorian Stage, was published by Pen & Sword in August 2017.

I have just completed a four year term as a member of The National Archives‘ User Advisory Group, which I’ve written about here. I am also a member of both the Royal Historical Society and the Society for Theatre Research.

 

My review:

Thanks to Alex from Pen & Sword for providing me with a review paperback copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

If you have been following my reviews for some time, you will be aware that I have read a number of the historical books published by Pen & Sword. I tend to be more interested in social history and how historical changes affected the lives of those who don’t always figure in the big History treatises. Being a lover of plays and a kin theatregoer, I was very curious about this book. Yes, theatre gossip was intriguing, but getting a sense of what life on the Victorian stage must have been like was my main interest. Although sometimes we discover that life has changed dramatically in a reasonably short period of times, some things do not seem to change much. And human curiosity and the love of gossip are among those things. If Victorians had no access to social media, there were plenty of newspapers and periodicals to keep them entertained, and actors were as much a subject of interest then as they are now.

The author does not follow a narrative or chooses a few big cases in this book, but rather illustrates the sheer amount of theatrical news that occupied the Victorian press of the time, not only in London but also in the provinces. As communications improved, newspapers even started featuring stories about actors in America (either natives or British authors touring there) and although sometimes the features lacked in detail (in some cases a suicide or a death would not feature the name of those involved) they were always after items that would attract the public’s attention. Darby divides the book into three parts: Part 1 deals with the business side of things (including such matters as licenses, libel, bankruptcy, breach of contract…), Part 2 looks at criminal lives (from blackmail and assault to prostitution and murder), and Part 3 delves into the personal lives of the actors (what we would probably consider gossip proper, although not all of it is gossip. The chapter on death and disaster deals with serious matter and also makes us look at security measures and disasters in theatres, bigamy seems to have been much more common than it is today, and personally I was fascinated by the chapter on breaches of promise, as I had not realise that there were laws that offered more protection to women in those circumstances than I would have expected).  Each chapter shares both, examples of standard cases of what would usually find its way into the newspapers (brief pieces with hardly any detail) and it dedicates more space to others that were better known, but no single case gets all the limelight. In many ways, this book is like a sampler, where people interested in the subject can learn more and be pointed in the right direction to research further.

The author’s style of writing is direct, and mostly allows the sources to do the talking. She provides sufficient background (on legal matters, the nature of performances, technical issues…) for readers to appreciate the items she discusses, and also some reflections on her own take on the materials. She notes how some periodicals, like The Era, were in a double-bind of sorts, as they tried hard to defend the profession of acting on the stage (that had a pretty bad reputation, especially in the case of women), insisting that actors were honourable and true professionals, whilst at the same time featured “sensational” news to attract readers. Although these days respectability is not a concept many people are worried about, it is true that the press has a hard time trying to reconcile the ideal of protectors of the truth, whilst fighting to keep the attention of the public by any means necessary. Is it possible to keep the moral high ground whilst publishing gossip and innuendo?

Although this is not, perhaps, a book for the general reading public, as I read I kept thinking about how useful this book would be to writers of historical fiction interested in the period (and not only for those considering using a theatrical background in their story but also for those thinking about the press of the time and even society at large) and to historians. Darby provides end notes full of details, both of the sources of her research and also of further information available. Although she mostly uses newspapers, she digs on the archives to confirm details such as names (as many actors and actresses used stage names and some of those were fairly popular) and discovers that Mark Twain wasn’t the only one whose death had been grossly exaggerated (deaths, marriages… were often misreported). The paperback also contains pictures that allow us to put faces to some of the names and help transport us to the era.

In sum, this is a book that will greatly assist writers, historians, and people passionate about the Victorian era and the history of the stage in the UK. It is a good starting point for those who want a general view of the topic and/or are looking for inspiration for their next story or research project. And if you just want to confirm that people’s love for gossip about the stars has not changed over the years, this is your book. (Oh, and I’m pretty intrigued about the writer too. I think she is somebody writers of historical crime novels might want to follow closely).

Thanks to Pen & Sword and to the author, thanks to all of you for reading and remember to like, share, comment, click and REVIEW!

By OlgaNunez

I was born in Barcelona and after living in the UK for many years have now returned home. I teach English, volunteer at Sants 3 Ràdio, a local radio station, I'm a writer, translator (English-Spanish and vice-versa) and I'm a medical doctor and worked in Forensic Psychiatry many years. I also have a BA and a PhD in American Literature and Film, and a Masters in Criminology. I've always loved books and apart from writing them I review them often.
I write a bit of everything, check my books for more information and my about page for links.
My blog is bilingual, English and Spanish.

23 replies on “#Bookreview LIFE ON THE VICTORIAN STAGE: THEATRICAL GOSSIP by Nell Darby (@nelldarby) A great resource for writers of historical fiction, historians, and people who love social history and the Victorian period #History #Victorianera”

Thanks, Debby. What called my attention, in particular, was how little things have changed over time, and the sheer amount of press coverage give to the subject. I guess we have always been fond of gossip! I enjoy reading historical fiction but I am not sure I have the patience for the research required at this point in life, although, who knows? Have a great week!

Thanks Olga. My sentiments. I admire those historical fiction writers who have the added task of researching those periods. 🙂 Happy holiday season Olga! 😉

Thanks, Pete. You are right. And that was my thought, precisely. I even mentioned it in a comment on her blog, although I think she has many things on her plate right now. Take care and have a great week.

Thanks so much! I know what you mean. I must confess to feeling envious I hadn’t come up with the idea. What a great excuse to go digging into history! Thanks, Icky!

Thanks, Robbie. You would find much to think about in this book then. The events paint a very vivid image of what the theatre business was like at the time. Have a lovely week.

It worked but yesterday my own computer kept telling me I had already submitted comments I hadn’t so I wonder. Thanks. Sometimes I find crying therapeutic. It’s not a bad crying, if you know what I mean. Many thanks for your efforts, Teagan.

How weird. It seems that the comments worked OK but it must not have shown it… Oh, it kept telling me I was submitting the same comment twice yesterday,so perhaps the changing are affecting it. I know what you mean. That’s why I request it too!

This is interesting and intriguing. Im sure theatre actors and actresses will be able to relate to this story. As for me, Ill probably have fun reading the gossips surrounding the story.

I am sure you’re right, indeed. Your comment went to Spam but I managed to find it. I hope you have a great week. Thanks!

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