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#TuesdayBookBlog FRED’S FUNERAL by Sandy Day (@sandeetweets). A poignant and lovingly written ode to an unsung hero. Beautiful and heart-wrenching. #RBRT #WWI

Dear all:

Today I bring you a beautiful (if sad) book, that is a fictionalisation of the story of a young Canadian man who fought in WWI.

Fred's Funeral by Sandy Day
Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

Fred Sadler has just died of old age. It’s 1986, seventy years after he marched off to WWI, and the ghost of Fred Sadler hovers near the ceiling of the nursing home. To Fred’s dismay, the arrangement of his funeral falls to his prudish sister-in-law, Viola. As she dominates the remembrance of Fred, he agonizes over his inability to set the record straight.

Was old Uncle Fred really suffering from shell shock? Why was he locked up most of his life in the Whitby Hospital for the Insane? Could his family not have done more for him?

Fred’s memories of his life as a child, his family’s hotel, the War, and the mental hospital, clash with Viola’s version of events as the family gathers on a rainy October night to pay their respects.

https://www.amazon.com/Freds-Funeral-Sandy-Day-ebook/dp/B0779Q7LR3/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Freds-Funeral-Sandy-Day-ebook/dp/B0779Q7LR3/

About the author:

Sandy Day is the author of Fred’s Funeral and Poems from the Chatterbox. She graduated from Glendon College, York University, with a degree in English Literature sometime in the last century. Sandy spends her summers in Jackson’s Point, Ontario on the shore of Lake Simcoe. She winters nearby in Sutton by the Black River. Sandy is a trained facilitator for the Toronto Writers Collective’s creative writing workshops. She is a developmental editor and book coach.

https://www.amazon.com/Sandy-Day/e/B005CVGIIA/

My review:

I am writing this review on behalf of Rosie’s Book Review Team (authors, check here if you are looking for reviews) and thank Rosie and the author for providing me a copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

This is a short book, but it punches well above its weight. The book, written mostly from the point of view of Fred Sadler, a Canadian veteran of WWI who never quite recovered from the war and spent years in and out of mental institutions (such as they were at the time), takes its readers on a journey through Fred’s memories (he has just died, so I guess I should say his ghost’s memories, but, in many ways, Fred had been a ghost of his former self for many years already) and those of the relatives who attend his funeral. We have brief hints at times of what other characters are thinking or feeling (as Fred’s consciousness becomes all-encompassing), but mostly we remain with Fred. We share in his opinions and his own remembrances of the facts his family members (mostly his sister-in-law, Viola, who is the only one left with first-hand-knowledge of his circumstances, at least some of them) are discussing.

Fred’s story — based on the life of a relative of the author and on documents and letters he left behind— will be familiar to readers interested in the history of the period, and in the terrible consequences the war had on the lives and mental health of many of the young men who fought and suffered in the war. Shell-shock (now known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD) was little understood at the time and psychiatry (that is not a hard science at its best) was pretty limited in its resources at the time. Even nowadays, delayed onset PTSD is rarely diagnosed and not well-understood, and the condition results sometimes in permanent changes in the personality of the sufferer, who might end up with all kinds of other diagnoses and are often misunderstood and mistreated.

Sandy Day’s beautifully descriptive and, at times, lyrical writing —the author had previously published a poetry book— captures both strands of the story: the terrible disintegration of the life of such a promising young man, and the changes in his family and the society around him, which he was only a spectator of (and was never allowed to take an active role in). His brother married and had children, his parents died; the family property, so dear to him, was split up and eventually sold, and he was only the weird uncle nobody knew much about.

The novel (as it is a fictionalization of the events) succeeds in giving Fred a voice, in bringing forth the fear, the thrashed hopes, the puzzlement, the resignation, the confusion, of this man who put his life on the line and got only pain in return. It is a poignant and beautiful memorial to the lives of many soldiers whose trauma was misunderstood and whose lives were destroyed. The writing is compelling and gets the readers inside of Fred’s head, making us share in his horrifying experiences. The book can be hard to read at times, not so much because of graphic content (although the few descriptions are vivid), but because it is impossible not to empathise and imagine what he must have gone through. But there is also a hopeful note in the interest of the new generations and the fact of the book itself.

There are time-shifts, and some changes in point of view (because Fred’s ghost can at times become the equivalent of an omniscient narrator), but past events follow a chronological order and are clearly demarcated and easy to follow, and the device of the funeral helps anchor the story and provide a frame and a background that give it a more personal and intimate dimension. The Canadian landscape and setting also add a touch of realism and singularity to the story.

Although the book is very short, I could not resist sharing at least a tiny sample of the beautiful writing with you:

He looks down half-blindly as his old Canadian Expeditionary Force Uniform dissolves into a constellation of colourful snowflakes, twirling away from him in a trail. Beneath the uniform he is nothing. He has no name or age. He is at once as old as a flickering blue base at the wick of a candle and as young as a flame surging into brilliance.

This is a poignant and lovingly written ode to a man who returned from WWI (at least in body) but was as lost as many of the men who never came back. A story about an unsung hero that should be cherished and its lessons learnt. I cannot recommend it enough.

Thanks to the author and to Rosie for coordinating such a great group of reviewers, thanks to all of you for reading and remember to like, share, comment, click and REVIEW.

[amazon_link asins=’B01K964GTK,0762754427,1937801853,0801478405,0553382403,1944430571,0773531882,1550051466′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’wwwauthortran-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’56249b1a-fb7e-11e7-a704-7d01cc700654′]

 

By OlgaNunez

I was born in Barcelona and after living in the UK for many years have now returned home. I teach English, volunteer at Sants 3 Ràdio, a local radio station, I'm a writer, translator (English-Spanish and vice-versa) and I'm a medical doctor and worked in Forensic Psychiatry many years. I also have a BA and a PhD in American Literature and Film, and a Masters in Criminology. I've always loved books and apart from writing them I review them often.
I write a bit of everything, check my books for more information and my about page for links.
My blog is bilingual, English and Spanish.

24 replies on “#TuesdayBookBlog FRED’S FUNERAL by Sandy Day (@sandeetweets). A poignant and lovingly written ode to an unsung hero. Beautiful and heart-wrenching. #RBRT #WWI”

Thanks, Pete. Yes, I agree. We must make the best of the anniversaries and official memorials. It is a short but very touching and powerful book. Take care.

Thanks, Debby. I found you again in the spam folder… You don’t seem to be in the good books of my blog! Yes, Robbie also reviews for Rosie’s team, although the author had approached me about it directly. Good minds and all that!

Lol, yes good minds. And Grr, I haven’t heard from anyone else so far about me going to the garbage, but if I do, I’ll have to contact Askimet again 🙂

Who knows? Teagan was also there and then there were two Japanese and a Turkish blogger (no idea what they were saying although one is definitely spam).

Lol, so maybe it’s your blog not recognizing certain people, as opposed to me or Teagan who have the spam monster on our tails? 🙂 I can’t speak for the Japanese or the Turk LOL

I haven’t changed the settings and it’s supposed to allow people who’ve commented before comment again, so who knows? A mystery… But the other strange thing is that sometimes comments seem to be in limbo, because I’m sure I had checked and there were no comments on spam, and then a lot of them turn up. Perhaps is the security plug… Anyway, here you are. 🙂

Hi Olga,
Sorry I’m late. Tuesday was a very physically difficult day (yes, the usual stress in addition). You’ve made this book sound very appealing — even though I’m never looking for “heart wrenching”. It’s also a great heads-up that you included that information. I’m sure it’s beautiful. Best of luck to Sandy. Hugs all around.

Thanks, Teagan. Sorry, I found you with Debby in the spam folder… I wonder… Some books, I think, require a certain state of mind… Have a good weekend (I hope stress free).

Thanks, Lilyn. You might want to check the sample, although as it is quite short I’m not sure you’ll get much sense of what it is like… Have a great weekend!

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