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#Bookreview #THE FEAR by C.L. Taylor (@callytaylor) An intense psychological thriller about a disturbing topic.

Hi all:

Today I bring you a book by a popular author I hadn’t read yet.

Cover of the Fear by C.L.Taylor book review
The Fear by C.L. Taylor

The Fear: The sensational new thriller from the Sunday Times bestseller, now in a brand new look for 2018 by C.L. Taylor

‘Claustrophobic and compelling’ KARIN SLAUGHTER
‘A rollercoaster with multiple twists’ DAILY MAIL
’A million dollar new story from a million selling author’ SARAH PINBOROUGH

Sometimes your first love won’t let you go…

When Lou Wandsworth ran away to France with her teacher Mike Hughes, she thought he was the love of her life. But Mike wasn’t what he seemed and he left her life in pieces.

Now 32, Lou discovers that he is involved with teenager Chloe Meadows. Determined to make sure history doesn’t repeat itself, she returns home to confront him for the damage he’s caused.

But Mike is a predator of the worst kind, and as Lou tries to bring him to justice, it’s clear that she could once again become his prey…

The million copy Sunday Times bestseller returns with a gripping psychological thriller that will have you on the edge of your seat.

Praise for The Fear:

‘A skewering portrait of obsessive love and psychological manipulation, this book gets under the skin from the outset and won’t let you go until you’ve gasped at THAT ending. This is Taylor’s best book yet.’
CJ Cooke (author of I Know My Name)

‘Wow! Such a fast-paced, gripping, tense thriller. My heart was in my mouth at the end. Her best yet!’
Claire Douglas (author of Local Girl Missing)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fear-sensational-thriller-Sunday-bestseller-ebook/dp/B07566QWH4/

Praise for The Fear:

‘Fans of C.L. Taylor are in for a treat. The Fear is her best yet.’
Clare Mackintosh (author of I Let You Go)

‘Smart, packing a punch to the heart, and dark in all the right places, The Fear has bestseller written all over it.’ Sarah Pinborough

‘A terrifying glimpse into a dark subject. This brilliant book stayed with me long after I finished the last page.’
Cass Green (author of In a Cottage in a Wood)

‘A highly original and timely tale that kept me utterly enthralled and entertained from beginning to end.’
Liz Nugent (author of Unravelling Oliver)

‘A total corker! Twisted, unbearably tense and a shock ending.’
CJ Tudor (author of The Chalk Man)

‘When you finish a book and your lungs hurt because you’ve FORGOTTEN TO BREATHE.’
Miranda Dickinson

‘Dark and disturbing. This is a book I will remember for a long time.’
Rachel Abbott

‘A gripping and disturbing psychological thriller, The Fear is as addictive as it is dark.’
Lucy Clarke

Tense, twisty, terrifying―with one of the best premises I’ve read in ages.’
Julie Cohen

‘I lost my entire weekend to it! What an absolutely cracking read…pacy, well written, and anxiety inducing.’
Lisa Hall

‘The Fear is a compulsive read, that forces the reader to consider just how far they would go to protect themselves and those around them. I could not put this book down!’
Emma Kavanagh

‘It’s a close call as the bar’s set so high but this has to be C.L. Taylor’s best yet. SO entertaining, high on the shock-factor and yet totally ‘real’.’
Caz Frear

‘The Fear covers very dark territory, but it is handled realistically and sensitively through her excellent writing…Fantastically plotted and perfectly paced, this dark thriller gets a standing ovation from me.’ S.J.I. Holliday

‘A disturbing and all too real story that tests your own morals as you quickly flick through the pages. Dark, claustrophobic realism – I was completed gripped.’ Mel Sherratt

Author C.L. Taylor Book review The Fear
Author C.L. Taylor

About the Author

C.L. Taylor is the Sunday Times bestselling author of five gripping, stand-alone psychological thrillers: THE ACCIDENT, THE LIE, THE MISSING, THE ESCAPE and THE FEAR. Her books have sold in excess of a million copies, been number one on Amazon Kindle, Kobo, iBooks and Google Play and have been translated into over 20 languages. THE ESCAPE won the Dead Good Books ‘Hidden Depths’ award for the Most Unreliable Narrator and THE LIE has been optioned for TV by The Forge who produced National Treasure featuring Robbie Coltrane.

Cally Taylor was born in Worcester and spent her early years living in various army camps in the UK and Germany. She studied Psychology at the University of Northumbria and went on forge a career in instructional design and e-Learning before leaving to write full time in 2014.

She started writing short stories in 2005 and was published widely in literary and women’s magazines. She also won several short story competitions. In 2009 and 2011 her romantic comedy novels (as Cally Taylor) were published by Orion and translated into fourteen languages. HEAVEN CAN WAIT was a bestseller in Hungary and China and HOME FOR CHRISTMAS was made into a feature film by JumpStart Productions. Whilst on maternity leave with her son Cally had an idea for a psychological thriller and turned to crime. She has also written a Young Adult thriller, THE TREATMENT, which was published by HarperCollins HQ.

C.L. Taylor lives in Bristol with her partner and young son.

Sign up to join the CL Taylor Book Club for access to news, updates, and information that isn’t available on the web, as well as exclusive newsletter-only competitions and giveaways and the books that CL Taylor thinks will be the next big thing. You will also receive THE LODGER for free when you sign up:

http://www.callytaylor.co.uk/cltaylorbookclub.html

www.cltaylorauthor.com

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https://www.amazon.co.uk/C.L.-Taylor/e/B00ICKTWPE/

My review:

Thanks to NetGalley and to the Publishers (Avon) for offering me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

After reading this novel, which is a page-turner and moves at a fast pace, I checked the reviews, and it is one of these odd cases when I agreed both with the positive and with the negative reviews about the book. Some of them compared it to other novels by C.L. Taylor, an author who has a big following (this novel is a bestseller Amazon UK), but as I had not read anything by her before, I cannot comment on that. But I agreed with some of the other opinions.

The novel revolves around three females, two grown women, and a thirteen-year-old girl. In fact, they are three generations, with Wendy the oldest and Chloe the youngest. We follow the points of view of the three women for most of the novel, although there is more of the story told from Lou’s point of view. Her part of the story is narrated in the first person, while the rest are in the third person, and, at least at the beginning, she is the most active of the three. Due to her father’s death she has to go back to the town where she grew up, to deal with her father’s house, and her past comes back to haunt her, both figuratively and literally, when she sees the man who had abused her (Mike) when she was a teenager and worries that he is at it again. The three women have been affected by what Mike did, and the novel is very good at focusing on the emotions of the characters, that go from love to denial, and to absolute fear. Lou’s account is interspersed with fragments from her diary as a teenager, where we get to fully understand the background of the story and how dangerous this man truly is. The combination of charm, manipulation, and his skill at picking up girls lacking in confidence and easy targets for his advances is well portrayed. The subject matter reminded me of an Australian novel I’ve really enjoyed, The Silent Kookaburra (you can check my review here).

The subject remains as relevant (if not more) as ever, unfortunately, and this book offers a good perspective of the psychological damage such abuse can have, not only on the direct victims (that might never get over it) but also on those around them (family, wives, friends…). Should they have believed the abuser’s excuses? Are they guilty by association? What is their responsibility? The book is set in the UK and it refers specifically to changes in Criminal Law (like the introduction of the sex offenders register) but although it does not discuss those issues in detail, I don’t think that would cause difficulty to readers from other places.

The three characters fall (or have fallen) prey to Mike and find themselves in very vulnerable positions. It is impossible not to wonder what one would do faced with their dilemma, particularly that of Lou. Her impulsive actions are extreme and I agree with the readers who have commented that at times the book is over the top, although Lou’s doubts, her continuous hesitation, and her fear feel real. She is not alone in being pushed to the edge, and this is a book where characters do not play safe, rather the opposite.

The writing is fluid, and brings to life the three female characters, whose only connection is through Mike, perhaps with more immediacy in the case of Lou —this is helped by the first person narration and her diary— but it manages to make us empathise and feel for the three by the end of the story. And no, not all of them are likeable, to begin with.  I know some readers worry about head-hopping, but each chapter states clearly which character’s point of view we are following and there’s no possible confusion. Although there are brief moments of relief when things seem to be about to take a turn for the better, this is only to lure us into a false sense of security, and the tension and the pressure keep increasing and so does the pace. The ending is satisfying and will have most readers cheering on.

If you’re wondering what are the negative comments I agreed with, well, I was not necessarily talking about the degree of suspension of disbelief (yes, readers will need a fair deal of this, but as we are engaged with the characters and their plight, this is not difficult to maintain), but about some anachronisms, some details that seemed incongruent to the time when the story is set. I felt that the emphasis on Facebook messages, fake accounts, hacking, etc. seemed excessive for a story set in 2007. Other readers, who decided to research in more detail, discovered that indeed, some of the things mentioned, Apps, songs, etc., were not available yet. One reader noted that she could not understand why the story wasn’t set in the present, as that would have avoided these issues, but another pointed out that some aspects of the plot would only make sense if the story was set up in the recent past (including some of the legal issues). I wonder (as a writer) if the story was originally set in the present but somebody spotted the plot issues and came up with the solution of moving it back in time (without changing some of the modern references).

This novel does a good job of creating believable characters and making readers think about the plight of the victims of paedophiles. Although it might be less satisfactory to die-hard lovers of police procedural books, I think it is difficult to read it without empathising with the female characters and having to pause to reflect on this serious issue. And the questions at the end will further engage book club readers and encourage meaningful discussion. I don’t think this will be the last novel by C.L. Taylor I’ll read and I can easily understand why she is popular. (Ah, and she calls book bloggers book fairies. I like that!)

Thanks to all of you for reading and remember to like, share, comment, read, REVIEW and keep smiling!

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By OlgaNunez

I was born in Barcelona and after living in the UK for many years have now returned home. I teach English, volunteer at Sants 3 Ràdio, a local radio station, I'm a writer, translator (English-Spanish and vice-versa) and I'm a medical doctor and worked in Forensic Psychiatry many years. I also have a BA and a PhD in American Literature and Film, and a Masters in Criminology. I've always loved books and apart from writing them I review them often.
I write a bit of everything, check my books for more information and my about page for links.
My blog is bilingual, English and Spanish.

16 replies on “#Bookreview #THE FEAR by C.L. Taylor (@callytaylor) An intense psychological thriller about a disturbing topic.”

Thanks, Sally. You’re very kind. Yes. Perhaps because the authors have lived through the period they feel too confident their memory won’t let them down, whilst a writer of historical fiction would always check the details. So much so for people thinking that books conventionally published always get everything right… Have a great week.

I think these sorts of books have a huge impact on readers, Olga. So many women have had brushes with abuses of some sort or another from very serious to less so but all incidents impact on the victim. Lovely review as always. I have finished I love your cupcakes and will review it on my blog this coming Saturday. I loved it!

Thanks, Robbie. I totally agree. It is also good that this book shows the perspective of victims at different stages and also of people we might not consider victims although they also suffer (like relatives). And thanks for your comment about my book. I’m so pleased you enjoyed it. A new edition of the Spanish version of Cupcakes will get published (finger crossed) by a small and fairly new Spanish publishing company in a few weeks, so I hope it might get a bit of an airing. If you were closer I’d ask you to join us and bring one of your lovely creations whenever we do the presentation (I think there will be one). Have a lovely week! ♥

From your review, it sounds like a missed opportunity, to have a really contemporary thriller surrounding the many problems with social media. That said, I would almost certainly watch something like this on TV.
Best wishes, Pete.

Thanks, Pete. It does work well and the characters and situations are well portrayed (although sometimes you need to check your critical abilities at the door) although, as I said, it works better at an emotional level than as a police procedural. But I’m sure you’re right and it would make a great TV drama/thriller. Have a great week.

Hi Olga. Thanks for this compelling review. You make a good case for reading the book, while being honest about it. Anything that gets described as both “claustrophobic” and a “roller coaster” has to be intriguing. Hugs.

Thanks, Teagan. A fascinating book, although not without some issues. But I recommend it for people who are particularly drawn to characters. Have a great week!

Thanks, Luccia. It has its good and its not so good points, but she can write, for sure, and I am likely to read another one of her novels in the future.

Good to know it wasn’t only me, as people are raving about it. I’m curious to see what he’ll write next, but he knows the market.

Yes… I thought his descriptions of the psychiatric condition were good, but I always worry about the depictions of professionals who seem to have no common sense whatsoever (although, of course, I’ve met some who don’t, but usually the professional training kicks in, in certain situations…)

I don’t know if I’m able to read a book dealing with the effects of psychological abuse at home, but this does look temping. Whomever designed the cover did a fantastic job!

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