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#Bookreview HOLDING by Graham Norton (@grahnort) Not a genre novel but an interesting story #TuesdayBookBlog

Hi all:

I keep trying to catch up on recent reviews, and here I bring you one that I must confess I was curious about because of the writer.

Holding by Graham Norton
Holding by Graham Norton

Holding by Graham Norton  (Author) 

It’s funny and wonderfully perceptive’ Wendy Holden

‘Poised and perceptive’ the Sunday Times

‘It is beautiful and yet devastatingly sad’ Daily Express

‘A considerable achievement … one of the more authentic debuts I’ve read in recent years … in such an understated manner, eschewing linguistic eccentricity … in favour of genuine characters and tender feeling…this is a fine novel.’ John Boyne, Irish Times

‘Deeply accomplished…brilliantly observed’ Good Housekeeping

‘An undercurrent of black comedy accompanies the ripples that ensue – but with a pathos that makes this deftly plotted story as moving as it is compelling.’ Sunday Mirror

‘Strenuously charming…surprisingly tender’ Metro 

‘Heartwarming and observant’ Stylist

Graham Norton’s masterful debut is an intelligently crafted story of love, secrets and loss.

The remote Irish village of Duneen has known little drama; and yet its inhabitants are troubled. Sergeant PJ Collins hasn’t always been this overweight; mother of­ two Brid Riordan hasn’t always been an alcoholic; and elegant Evelyn Ross hasn’t always felt that her life was a total waste.

So when human remains are discovered on an old farm, suspected to be that of Tommy Burke – a former­ love of both Brid and Evelyn – the village’s dark past begins to unravel. As the frustrated PJ struggles to solve a genuine case for the first time in his life, he unearths a community’s worth of anger and resentments, secrets and regret.
Darkly comic, touching and at times profoundly sad. Graham Norton employs his acerbic wit to breathe life into a host of loveable characters and explore – with searing honesty – the complexities and contradictions that make us human.

 

A Note From the Publisher

HOLDING is not the novel I planned to write, at least, not at first. But following the old adage to write about what you know, Ireland seemed a good place to start, especially rural Ireland. I did have in mind a cast of characters living in and around a small village where their lives would reflect the priorities and concerns – land, marriage, religion – that are so present in that area still.

I found as I wrote more about the characters of Duneen that each of them had in some way become suspended in time – due to grief, due to unhappiness, due to fear of failure – and that they were all holding on to their own secrets.

I am hugely excited that HOLDING is now heading out into the world, and would love to hear what you think. Please do let me know on Twitter@Grahnort using the hashtag #readholding. I will be watching!

 

See all 6 formats and editions

 

 

 

 

Not a genre novel but an interesting story

Thanks to Net Galley and to Hodder & Stoughton for offering me a free copy of this novel.

I have several confessions to make. Yes, I know who Graham Norton is, although I don’t watch his television programme often, and I don’t follow Eurovision (even when Sir Terry Wogan hosted the UK version of Eurovision, and I was a big fan of his, I didn’t watch it), although I sometimes catch bits of his radio programme on Radio 2. So, although I suppose I had expectations, they can’t compare to other people’s.

I haven’t read any of his autobiographical books, so I didn’t have anything to compare this novel to, other than the many books I read by other authors.

I must also confess that I had a look at other reviews before writing mine and I will mention them, although not in detail.

This novel is in many ways the Irish equivalent (if there is such a thing) of the small town thrillers that are very common in the US. We have mysteries, we have a dark underbelly (well, not quite so dark), we have secrets, and we have many people whose lives are not as they appear to be. The book is listed under General Fiction and Mystery (Crime, Thriller) but I’m not sure how well it fits in the second one, at least stylistically, not so much from the story point of view.

The story is told in the third person but from the point of view of quite a few of the characters in the novel. If one had to choose a protagonist, perhaps it would be P.J. Collins the large Sergeant who lives alone and always expects people to laugh at him because of his weight. When bones are unearthed at a local building site, suddenly some excitement comes into his life. Because the owner of the farm where the bones are found left to never return many years back, the suspicion is he might be the one buried there, and suddenly two women who had fought over him start thinking about him again. Of course, due to the nature of the crime, police officers from Cork come to take charge and there is general disruption. And of course, things get complicated.

I didn’t find it difficult to follow the different points of view as they tend to be clearly demarcated and the characters are very different, although I thought that in the last chapter before the epilogue the switches were a bit fast and not so well demarcated, and some people might not enjoy the head-hopping.

I’ve noticed that several of the reviews commented that the portrayal of small town Ireland seemed timeless, and it is true that other than mentions of DNA tests, mobile phones and i-Pads, there isn’t much that could not have fitted in any other era (although we assume it’s contemporary). Memories of the past by several of the characters appear more vivid at times than the present era and ring truer.

Although the characters do not appear to be very sophisticated or complex, there is enough background history to create a picture in the minds of the reader, although some might result very familiar to habitual readers (adulterous husband, unhappy married woman who drinks too much, three unmarried sisters still living together, the town’s busybody…). My main problem with the characters was that I never felt I truly connected with any of them and I’m not sure if that is perhaps because all of them seem to be observing themselves rather than living or feeling. They are all lonely, even the ones who are in relationships, and seem frozen (as the writer notes in his comments), unable to move on because of some loss long ago (be it real or imagined). It brought to my mind Carson McCullers’s The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, not because of the style or setting, but because of the feeling of the characters (although far less dark).

I read in some of the comments that there was humour. Perhaps it was my frame of mind when I read it (although I don’t think it was particularly dark) and some of the characterizations and the events could be funny in their own right, but combined with the characters and their circumstances I would not recommend it as a funny story.

There writing is fairly descriptive and the pace leisurely rather than the frantic pace of thrillers, and for me, there was more showing than telling at some points of the story that also gave it a more contemplative style than is usual in modern mysteries.

The plot was well built and the story and the details are interesting (with some minor surprises although the general gist is not that difficult to guess). It also ends on a more positive note than the rest of the novel anticipates but I won’t comment on it not to spoil the story.

Overall it is an interesting novel, easy to read although it perhaps doesn’t sit easy either as a thriller or a cozy mystery (none of the characters is weird or peculiar enough and the mystery itself is more realistic than in these kinds of stories) and that makes it a bit more challenging to recommend to genre readers.

Thanks to the publishers, the writer and to NetGalley for the novel, thanks to all of you for reading, and please, like, share, comment and CLICK!

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Merry #Christmas from all of us! I hope you have a good holiday!

Hi all!

It’s Christmas! I doubt that many of you will be reading this, but just in case, a few of my characters wanted to wish you a good holiday:

Dashiell, one of the demos in Angelic Business 2. Shapes of Greg
Dashiell, one of the demons in Angelic Business 2. Shapes of Greg

Dashiell (better known as Dash, and yes, he’s pretty dashing. They love him in Twitter!) wanted me to tell you that it’s OK to be a bit naughty these days. But then, he’s a demon!

G
G, Greg or Gregorious

G, Greg, or Gregorious, another demon (yes, he’s one of the main characters) in the Angelic Business series, wanted me to tell you that it’s OK to make mistakes and we all make a wrong choice from time to time (he should know!). Although, sometimes there’s a price to pay.

 Azrael
Azrael

Azrael is an angel (yes, I know you can see that), also in Angelic Business and asked me to tell you that magic exists and there are more things than what we can see, if we only believe in ourselves and others.

Pink
Pink, the heroine of Angelic Business

Pink, the protagonist of Angelic Business, wanted to remind you that you can do more things than you realise and if you believe in yourself, there are no limits. Of course, with a little help from your friends (and in her case, an angel and a demon too).

Dulce from I Love Your Cupcakes
Dulce from I Love Your Cupcakes

Dulce, from I Love Your Cupcakes, hopes you have a very sweet holiday season.

Escaping Psychiatry. Beginnings
Escaping Psychiatry. Beginnings

And Mary Miller from Escaping Psychiatry, who’s a bit shy, wanted to share a link to the first chapters of the prequel that it’s appearing now in Wattpad, just in case you want to do something not very Christmassy. (I’ll be sharing it in my blog from next year too).

https://www.wattpad.com/myworks/57064879-escaping-psychiatry-beginnings

And from me, Merry Christmas!

Sky with angel

Ah, just in case you’ve forgotten, the first novel in the Angelic Business series, is FREE, here.

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