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#Bookreview 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster. Four stories of the man as a young artist. For lovers of experimental literary fiction and New York.

Hi, all.

If you have been following my blog for a while you’ll know I’ve been trying to keep up with the Man-Booker Prize this year. Here is a review of another one of the books that made it into the shortlist.

4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster
4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster

4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster

LONGLISTED (AND NOW SHORTLISTED) FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017

On March 3, 1947, in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson’s life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths. Four Fergusons made of the same genetic material, four boys who are the same boy, will go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives. Family fortunes diverge. Loves and friendships and intellectual passions contrast. Chapter by chapter, the rotating narratives evolve into an elaborate dance of inner worlds enfolded within the outer forces of history as, one by one, the intimate plot of each Ferguson’s story rushes on across the tumultuous and fractured terrain of mid twentieth-century America. A boy grows up-again and again and again.

As inventive and dexterously constructed as anything Paul Auster has ever written 4 3 2 1 is an unforgettable tour de force, the crowning work of this masterful writer’s extraordinary career.

 

https://www.amazon.com/4-3-2-Paul-Auster-ebook/dp/B01LZPLGUS/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/4-3-2-Paul-Auster-ebook/dp/B01LZPLGUS/

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

An Amazon Best Book of February 2017: Paul Auster’s 4321 is his first novel in seven years, and it feels extra personal. Details of a life spent growing up in Brooklyn—of loving the Brooklyn Dodgers, Laurel and Hardy, summer camp—are laid out with the earnest intensity of a writer looking back on his life. Plot points arise—for instance, a person is killed by lightning—which mimic more unique moments from Auster’s own life experience. At nearly 900 pages, it is also a long novel—but a reason for that is 4321 tells the story of its protagonist, Archie Ferguson, four different times. What remains consistent throughout Archie’s life (or lives) is that his father starts out with the same career, Archie falls in love with the same girl, and his personality seems more nature than nurture. But those are starting off points, and if our lives are the sum of our choices, they are the sum of other people’s choices as well. Circumstances matter, and what will keep you thinking about this book is the convergence of time and circumstance within each of Archie’s different lives. His past propels him, his circumstances form him, and regardless of which life we are reading, time will ultimately take him. –Chris Schluep, The Amazon Book Review

Editorial Reviews

“[Paul] Auster’s deep understanding of his characters, soothing baritone, and skillful pacing…deliver an immensely satisfying experience overall for listeners”
-AudioFile Magazine

“An epic bildungsroman . . . . Original and complex . . . . It’s impossible not to be impressed – and even a little awed – by what Auster has accomplished. . . . A work of outsize ambition and remarkable craft, a monumental assemblage of competing and complementary fictions, a novel that contains multitudes.”―Tom PerrottaThe New York Times Book Review

“A stunningly ambitious novel, and a pleasure to read. Auster’s writing is joyful even in the book’s darkest moments, and never ponderous or showy. . . . An incredibly moving, true journey.”―NPR

Ingenious . . . . Structurally inventive and surprisingly moving. . . . 4 3 2 1 reads like [a] big social drama . . . while also offering the philosophical exploration of one man’s fate.”―Esquire

Mesmerizing . . . Continues to push the narrative envelope. . . . Four distinct characters whose lives diverge and intersect in devious, rollicking ways, reminiscent of Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life. . . . Prismatic and rich in period detail4 3 2 1 reflects the high spirits of postwar America as well as the despair coiled, asplike, in its shadows.”―O, the Oprah Magazine

Sharply observed . . . . Reads like a sprawling, 19th-century novel.”―The Wall Street Journal

Ambitious and sprawling . . . . Immersive . . . . Auster has a startling ability to report the world in novel ways.”―USA Today

“The power of [Auster’s] best work is . . . his faithful pursuit of the mission proposed in The Invention of Solitude, to explore the ‘infinite possibilities of a limited space’ . . . . The effect [of 4 3 2 1] is almost cubist in its multidimensionality―that of a single, exceptionally variegated life displayed in the round. . . . [An] impressively ambitious novel.”―Harper’s Magazine

“Auster’s magnificent new novel is reminiscent ofInvisible in that it deals with the impossibility of containing a life in a single story . . . . Undeniably intriguing . . . . A mesmerizing chronicle of one character’s four lives . . . The finest―though one hopes, far from final―act in one of the mightiest writing careers of the last half-century.”―Paste Magazine

Wonderfully clever . . . . 4 3 2 1 is much more than a piece of literary gamesmanship . . . . It is a heartfelt and engaging piece of storytelling that unflinchingly explores the 20thcentury American experience in all its honor and ignominy. This is, without doubt, Auster’s magnum opus. . . . A true revelation . . . One can’t help but admit they are in the presence of a genius.”―Toronto Star

“A multitiered examination of the implications of fate . . . in which the structure of the book reminds us of its own conditionality. . . . A signifier of both possibility and its limitations.”―The Washington Post

“At the heart of this novel is a provocative question: What would have happened if your life had taken a different turn at a critical moment? . Ingenious.”―Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Auster presents four lovingly detailed portrayals of the intensity of youth – of awkwardness and frustration, but also of passion for books, films, sport, politics, and sex. . . . [Trying] to think of comparisons [to the novel] . . . [nothing] is exactly right . . . . What he is driving at is not only the role of contingency and the unexpected but the ‘what-ifs’ that haunt us, the imaginary lives we hold in our minds that run parallel to our actual existence.”―The Guardian

“Draws the reader in from the very first sentence and does not let go until the very end. . . . An absorbing, detailed account – four accounts! – of growing up in the decades following World War II. . . . Auster’sprose is never less than arresting … In addition to being a bildungsroman, “4321” is a “künstlerroman,” a portrait of the artist as a young man whose literary ambition is evident even in childhood. . . . I emerged from . . . this prodigious book eager for more.”―San Francisco Chronicle

“Leaves readers feeling they know every minute detail of [Ferguson’s] inner life as if they were lifelong companions and daily confidants. . . . It’s like an epic game of MASH: Will Ferguson grow up in Montclair or Manhattan? Excel in baseball or basketball? Date girls or love boys too? Live or die? . . A detailed landscape . . . for readers who like taking the scenic route.”―TIME Magazine

“Auster pays tribute to what Rose Ferguson thinks of as a ‘dear, dirty, devouring New York, the capital of human faces, the horizontal Babel of human tongues.’. . . Sprawling . . . occasionally splendid.”―The New Yorker

“A bona fide epic . . . both accessible and formally daring.”―Minneapolis Star Tribune

Inventive, engrossing.”―St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Arresting .. . A hugely accomplished work, a novel unlike any other.”―The National (UAE)

“Brilliantly rendered, intricately plotted . . . a magnum opus.”―Columbia Magazine

“Auster’s first novel in seven years is . . . . an ingenious move . . . . Auster’s sense of possibility, his understanding of what all his Fergusons have in common, with us and one another, is a kind of quiet intensity, a striving to discover who they are. . . . [He] reminds us that not just life, but also narrative is always conditional, that it only appears inevitable after the fact.”―Kirkus (starred review)

“Auster has been turning readers’ heads for three decades, bending the conventions of storytelling . . . . He now presents his most capacious, demanding, eventful, suspenseful, erotic, structurally audacious, funny, and soulful novel to date . . . [a] ravishing opus.”―Booklist (starred review)

Rich and detailed. It’s about accidents of fate, and the people and works of art and experiences that shape our lives even before our birth―what reader doesn’t vibrate at that frequency?”―Lydia Kiesling, Slate

“Auster illuminates how the discrete moments in one’s life form the plot points of a sprawling narrative, rife with possibility.”―Library Journal (starred review)

Mesmerizing . . . . A wonderful work of realist fiction and well worth the time.”―Read it Forward

Frisky and sinuous . . . energetic. . . . A portrait of a cultural era coming into being . . . the era that is our own.”―Tablet magazine

“Almost everything about Auster’s new novel is big. . . Satisfyingly rich in detail . . . . A significant and immersive entry to a genre that stretches back centuries and includes Augie March and Tristram Shandy.”―Publishers Weekly

Author Paul Auster
Author Paul Auster

About the author:

Paul Auster is the bestselling author of Travels in the Scriptorium, The Brooklyn Follies, and Oracle Night. I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project anthology, which he edited, was also a national bestseller. His work has been translated into thirty languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

https://www.amazon.com/Paul-Auster/e/B000APVFU4/

My review:

Thanks to NetGalley and to Faber & Faber for providing me with an ARC copy of this novel that I freely chose to review.

I’ve been following with interest the Man-Booker Prize this year and realised I had quite a few of the books on my list to be read and decided to try and read in a timely manner and see how my opinion compared to that of the judges. When the shortlist was announced, only one of the books I had read so far had made it, Exit West by Mohsin Hamid, a book I really enjoyed. And then I got the chance to read 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster, another one of the novels shortlisted, and I could not resist.

I had read a novel by Paul Auster years back, The Book of Illusions and although I remember I enjoyed it, I had never read another one of his books until now. It wasn’t a conscious decision, and I had always kept in mind that at some point I should pick up another one of his books but that day hadn’t arrived.

I hadn’t read anything about this novel before I started reading it, other than it had been shortlisted for the Man-Booker, and therefore I was a bit surprised and confused, to begin with.

First, as happens with e-books, I had no idea how long it was. It’s around the 900 pages mark. Second, I didn’t realise it was a fairly experimental novel, or, at least its structure was not standard. The novel starts as if it was going to be a family saga, with the story of a Jewish immigrant arriving in New York, and we follow his story and that of his family for a couple of generations until we get to the birth of a boy, Archibald Ferguson. He doesn’t like his first name that much and for the rest of the novel, he is referred to as Ferguson. When things start getting weird is when at some point you become aware that you are reading four different versions of his life. These are narrated in the third person, although always from the point of view of the character, and yes, they are numbered.  So the first chapter (or part), you would have 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and then, the next part would be 2.1… and so on. The story (stories) are told chronologically but chopped up into bits. Some of the reviewers have commented that you need to be a member of MENSA to remember and differentiate the various stories, because yes, there are differences (fate seems to play a big part, as sometimes due to incidents that happen to his family, financial difficulties, relationship issues… the story takes a different turn and deviates from the other versions), but these are not huge, and it is difficult to keep in your mind which one of the versions is which one (at times I would have been reading for a while before I could remember how this version was different to the one I had just been reading). Because the differences are not major (yes, in one version he ends up going to a university and in another to a different one, in one he works at a newspaper and in another starts writing books, in one he goes out with a girl and in another they are only friends…), and the characters are pretty much the same in all versions (although sometimes their behaviour is quite different) it makes the stories very similar. Added to that, all versions of the character are also very similar as if the different circumstances were not earth-shattering and had not affected that much the development of his boy (in the debate of nature, nurture, it’s safe to say Auster supports nature). The devil seems to be in the detail, or perhaps the point is that we might strongly believe that there are moments when our decisions could have sent us down one path or a completely different one (Sliding Doors anyone?), but the truth is that of all the infinite possibilities (and that makes me think of a book I read very recently, Do You Realize?) only one is conducive to life as we know it (the Goldilocks theory of life. Neither too hot nor too cold, just right) and our life was meant to be as it if.

Ferguson loves films and is a bit of a film buff (there are lengthy digressions about Laurel & Hardy, the French New Wave, American Films…), he also loves books and writing, and some versions of the story include his translations of French poets, or his own stories (that sometimes end up being exactly the same as the story we are reading, and others are either full stories or fragments of the books he is writing), and sports, mostly baseball, although also basketball.

Towards the end of the book (well, it’s a long book, so let’s say from the time the characters goes to college), we get much more detailed information about politics and historical events in America. There are lengthy descriptions of reactions to the murders of J.F.K, Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy, race riots, the Black Power Movement, the Vietnam War and the anti-war movement, the Columbia University demonstrations, and student political organisations, and also about New York and Paris (more New York than Paris) in the 1960s and early 70s. Although in one of the versions Ferguson is attending Columbia, he is a reporter and even when he is physically there, he narrates the events as an observer rather than as if he was personally involved. His engagement seems to be intellectual above all, no matter what version of Ferguson we read, although the reasons for his attitude might be different.

I don’t want to end up with a review as long as the book itself, and after checking other reviews of the book, I thought I’d share a couple I particularly liked, so you can have a look.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1909935118?book_show_action=true&from_review_page=1

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/01/30/paul-austers-novel-of-chance

What I thought the book did very well, in all its versions, was to capture the feelings and the thoughts of a teenager and young man (although, as I’m a woman, I might be completely wrong). Although the emphasis is slightly different in each version, that is fairly consistent and rings true. As a writer and film lover, I enjoyed the comments about books and movies, although these could be frustrating to some readers. I also enjoyed the works in progress of the various Fergusons (some more than others) but this could again be annoying to readers who prefer to follow a story and not wander and float in flights of fancy. I agree with some of the comments I’ve read that the latter part of the book is slowed down even more by the endless description of incidents at Columbia that, no matter the version of the story we read, are analytically reported rather than brought to life.

My main problem with the book is that I did not connect that much with the main character. Considering the amount of time readers get to spend with the different versions of Ferguson, we get to know him, but I did not feel for him. Strangely enough, sometimes I felt more connected to some of the other characters in the story (his mother in some versions, some of his friends, a teacher…) than I did to him. I’m not sure if it was because it all felt very artificial, or because none of the versions completely gelled for me. I admired his intellect but did not connect at an emotional level and I did not care for him. I’m aware that readers who know Auster’s oeuvre better have commented on the biographical similarities with his own life, and I’m aware that he has denied it is (or are) his story. There are, for sure, many points of contact. Some readers have compared it to books that have used a somewhat similar format to tell their stories, but as I haven’t read any, I will not comment on that. The ending, metafictional as was to be expected, will probably satisfy more those who enjoy formal literary experiments than those looking for a good story. I do not think many people will find it surprising, but I don’t think that was the author’s goal. The writing is good, sometimes deep and challenging, others more perfunctory. And yes, I still intend to read other Auster’s books in the future.

In sum, a fascinating exercise in writing, that will be of interest primarily to followers of Auster’s career, to those who love experimental literary fiction, particularly those interested also in films, literature, the writing process, sports, and New York. Not a book I’d recommend to those who love dynamic stories with exciting plots, or those who prefer to emotionally engage with characters. Ah, and it requires a reasonable memory and a serious investment of time.

Thanks to NetGalley and to the publishers for the book, thanks to all of you for reading, and remember to like, share, comment, click, and of course, REVIEW!

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Categories
Movies

#IndiegoGo Campaign Anna & Modern Day Slavery by Magda Olchawska (@twopeoplemovie) A great and important #film that needs your support

Hi all:

Today I bring you a different type of post. Although I have talked about movies before, today I have the pleasure of bringing you a filmmaker, and one I have known for a few years.

Filmmaker Magda Olchawska

Magda M. Olchawska was one of the first people I met on Twitter. She has written children’s books and was one of the first people whose advice caught my attention. In fact, I started blogging because that was one of her suggestions, so if you want to blame anybody, now you know who it should be.

She made a great book trailer for my first book, The Man Who Never Was (it’s still a great book trailer although as I’ve changed the cover since it is more of a trip down memory lane for me. In case you want to check it, it is here) and we have kept in touch.

I have followed with interest her film project. She has been working on Anna & Modern Day Slavery and it has been through sheer determination and talent that she has managed to make it come true. Now she is running an IndiegoGo campaign to help distribute the film and I when I asked her if she would tell us something about her project, she kindly agreed to write a guest feature for my blog.

And here, I leave you with Magda:

I always wanted to make films, ever since I can remember I was glued to our black and white TV watching old Hollywood classics and dreaming of being part of the onscreen magic.

When I was old enough to choose I became totally obsessed with independent films with social themes.

Before I went to film school I already was a big admirer of Ken Loach and Krzysztof Kieslowski and decided that I wanted to make films that are not only entertaining but films with substance, ones that matter.

It shouldn’t then be surprising that I made a film about sex and human trafficking. However, six years ago when I decided to follow my dream and make a feature film by crowdfunding the entire production budget on IndieGoGo I had a completely different project in mind. I wanted to make a romantic comedy with social aspect (the main character was a human rights activist working in refugee camps). But once I met Lynn Robertson, a human rights activist fighting on behalf of trafficking victims my vision had changed. Lynn’s dedication and work inspired me to write a script that could help raise awareness about sex and human trafficking as well as some funding for small charities helping trafficking victims get their lives back, which is extremely difficult and requires not only strong support from various people but also strong will and determination.

From the very start, I knew it wasn’t going to be easy. However, within 6 months I had the script, cast, and crew ready and just enough funding to make a micro-budget film.

A still from the film

We shot the entire film in Poland on locations (my parent’s house was used as our main location) on $14000 budget within 9 days. My cast & crew came from nine different countries and four continents. It was a real group effort to make that story come to life. I was both pleased and surprised that everything came together at the same time and I was able to go into production within such a short period of time.

The production wasn’t trouble free but nothing major to make us shut down. We did struggle on daily basis with money and time. We simply didn’t have enough of both and as a compromise, I had to let go of quite a few scenes, which required from us to move locations and it’s always a huge logistic challenge.

Within those 9 days, we worked around the clock, got 6 hours sleep a night and pulled one 24-hour shooting day (by the end of that day it was just 4 people standing).

When I think back to that shoot I know it was wonderfully crazy, stretching our creative limitations to the limits.

But we did manage to not only survive this crazy shooting schedule but also in the process we made an important film that I truly hope will help people understand human trafficking, become more aware of this despicable crime against humanity and possibly be inspired to help trafficking victims.

Once I was done with the production I moved to the next stage of making a film, called “post-production”, which includes: editing, sound and music design and mix as well as color correction. That stage took me 4 years to complete. During that time, I honestly can say I had serious doubts whether this film was going to be finished. I encountered many technical problems from sound to editing that I didn’t even realize could have happened when I started dreaming this project into reality. I worked slowly but systematically every day and every summer holiday when my son was away with his grandparents.

I met a lot of people during this journey that helped me or supported me along the way.

Finally, in June/July 2015 I was ready to send the film off to sound and music mix as well as color correction. While the sound designer/composer and colorist were working on making my film even more amazing I ran another IndieGoGo campaign to raise funding for the post-production phase of my very long adventure.

Another still from the film

Anna & Modern Day Slavery was ready in January 2016 and after almost a year of unsuccessful film festival submissions, I was approached by a sales agent from Germany. We signed 6-months contract, which meant that for 6 months I couldn’t do anything with the film while the sales agent was trying to sell Anna to various European TV stations. Unfortunately, both festivals and the TV stations couldn’t find spots for Anna apparently ‘cos of the film’s unusual timing, which is 66 minutes.

Yes, I set off to make 80-90 min. long film. However, in order to make it at all, I needed to compromise somewhere along the way and I compromised by cut some of the scenes from the script.

Now I’m running one more and my last IndiegoGo campaign for this project to raise funding for charities helping trafficking victims.

The campaign will end on October 19th. And 50% all of the funds are going to go to small charities.

Please do check out my camping and if you have any questions do email me at magda(at)magdaolchawska.com

If you would like to find out more about crowdfunding download my e-book “How I Run Successful IndieGoGo Campaign to Make a Feature Film” e-book

If you are interested in learning how to make a micro-budget film check out my e-book How I Made My First Feature Film on $14000

These are the links where you can check Magda’s work and her campaign:

Link to the IndieGoGo campaign page:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/anna-and-modern-day-slavery-watch-the-film/x/59090#/

https://magdaolchawska.com/

And here you can check the video for the campaign:

Here Magda explains the process:

Thanks very much to Magda for her guest post, for explaining how you went about creating the film, and for informing us about her campaign, thanks to all of you for reading and watching, and remember to like, share, comment, click and CONTRIBUTE! It’s for a great cause!

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