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Book review Book reviews Tuesday Book Blog

#TuesdayBookBlog One Year of Ugly by Caroline Mackenzie (@BoroughPress) (@HarperCollinsUK) A memorable, witty and dark comedy. Highly recommended.

Hi all:

I bring you a book that although it might be an acquired taste, I enjoyed immensely.

One Year of Ugly by Caroline Mackenzie

One Year of Ugly by Caroline Mackenzie

‘Deliciously dark’ EMMA JANE UNSWORTH
‘Funny and important’ LAURA JANE WILLIAMS

It was Aunt Celia who got us into the whole mess. The entire Palacios family thrust smack into the middle of a crime ring.

Meet Yola Palacios.

Having escaped crumbling, socialist Venezuela, Yola and her family are settling into their peaceful new life in Trinidad.

But when her beloved Aunt Celia dies, the family once again find their lives turned upside down. For Celia had been keeping a very big secret – the Palacios are seriously in debt to a local criminal called Ugly, and without the funds to pay him off, they must do his bidding until the debt is cleared. So far, so ugly.

In the midst of the turmoil appears Román – Ugly’s distractingly gorgeous right-hand man. And although she knows it’s foolish, not to mention dangerous, Yola just can’t help but give in to the attraction. Could this wildly inappropriate (and very messy) romance be the perfect antidote?

Told with wry humour and irresistible wit, ONE YEAR OF UGLY is devastatingly funny, blisteringly fresh story of family, first love, and finding home.

https://www.amazon.com/One-Year-Ugly-raucous-debut-ebook/dp/B07W3PXWTS/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/One-Year-Ugly-raucous-debut-ebook/dp/B07W3PXWTS/

https://www.amazon.es/One-Year-Ugly-raucous-debut-ebook/dp/B07W3PXWTS/

About the author:

Hello there and welcome to my author page! This being my first rodeo as a published author, I’m thrilled to even be able to write that sentence. I suppose that’s the most important thing to know about me – I’m a first timer in the daunting world of publishing, and my debut novel ONE YEAR OF UGLY, out May (UK) and July (US) 2020, is the book that made that happen.

What else is there to know about me? I’m a French Creole (née de Verteuil) born and raised in Trinidad. I studied abroad for five years, first in France then in the UK, earning a BA in French and Spanish studies and an MSc in specialised translation. I’m now back living in Trinidad with my family and a veritable menagerie of tropical animals too bizarre to get into here.

As a new(ish) mum, I’m still navigating the demands of motherhood to figure out my new writing routine, but I’ve managed to get back to writing consistently every day, which is nothing short of a triumph. Novel #2 is consequently well underway.

To wrap up with a few fun facts:

  • The illicit stripclub setting in ONE YEAR OF UGLY was inspired by the two + years I spent waitressing/hostessing at a Spearmint Rhino during my undergrad studies in Brighton. You could call me a connoisseur of the stripclub industry.
  • I am a lifelong francophile and fantasise about moving to Martinique one day.
  • Reality TV is my most shameful yet effective means of unwinding. Nothing says ‘switch off your brain and rock back’ like a Bravo or MTV original series.

Follow me here and on Goodreads for updates on ONE YEAR OF UGLY’s upcoming release and to check out what books (and bad TV shows) I’m loving these days.

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8285902.Caroline_Mackenzie

My review:

Thanks to the Borough Press (Harper Collins UK) and NetGalley for providing me an ARC copy of this novel that I freely chose to review.

This is a debut novel, and what a debut! Although I hadn’t heard of the author before, I was thrilled when I realised that we had a few things in common (I’ve also worked as a translator, and we’re both alumnae of Sussex University. Go Sussex!), and I am sure this will not be the last novel I read by Mackenzie.

This novel touches on many things, and although it does it with wit and humour (at times a very sharp and quite dark sense of humour), the themes it delves in are quite serious. Illegal immigrants (in this case, Venezuelans in Trinidad) that try to settle into their new life, but whose already uncertain and danger-ridden existence becomes more complicated when they are blackmailed into doing all kind of other illegal things to settle the debt a member of their family, Aunt Celia, left unpaid upon her sudden death. The Palacios, an extended but close family, with their traditions, their unique personalities, their traditions from home and from their adopted land, their parties and meals together, with their quirks and their not-quite-upstanding members, are suddenly thrown into the hands of the criminal underworld, and their lives become even more dangerous. There is blackmail, housing other illegal immigrants, being tracked and followed, having to work all hours to keep their non-paying guests, being threatened and pushed around, and some of their members are even driven out of their minds by the pressure. To all these events (and more that I’m keeping quiet), we have to add life as usual for this family, and that includes secret love-children, a young girl’s pregnancy, dangerous love affairs, strong women (some with a flair for drama), weak-willed men, heavy drinking, unfaithful husbands, grief and mourning, mental illness, trying to fit into a completely different place and being the object of prejudice and suspicion. The author explains her reasons for choosing to write a comedy in her note at the end, and they make perfect sense to me. First, because, as she says, some people might resist reading another book that deals in some of these very serious topics if they are presented in a straightforward manner, but a comedy might reach those readers, and also because comedy and humour are great weapons to deal with dark situations and to endure and keep hope alive when things are tough. The author does a great job, both in dealing with the illegal immigration angle and also in creating a family that we love (or at times, love to hate).

There are many characters, some pretty major (not all the members of the family have important roles, but we do get to know them fairly well by the end of the novel, although there are plenty of surprises, and I’m not only talking about Aunt Milagros here), and others that only pass-by, like some of the illegal immigrants they are forced to house through the year, and in many cases, they are depicted like a cartoonist would do, exaggerating some traits for comedic purposes, but affectionately. Yola, the main protagonist, who narrates the story in the first-person, is intelligent, witty, hard-working, and although she might not see eye-to-eye with all the members of her family, she loves them fiercely and would do anything for all of them, even for the new arrivals that she’s not so keen on. Aunt Celia, who has died just before the story starts, is also very present in the novel, as she had been writing her biography/memoir, and the manuscript is passed on to Yola, who is also a writer and translator, and whom the majority of the members of the family think of as the most suited to follow in Aunt Celia’s steps (and become the family’s official bitch). Celia’s book is priceless, and we get to hear her voice through Yola’s reading. Then we have Ugly, who although doesn’t turn up often, his few appearances are very memorable. And Román, the romantic hero (yes, I know, the name is self-explanatory), who at first appears more of an antihero, but there is more to him than his gorgeous looks, and, well, let’s say the romance side of the story is bound to satisfy most readers keen on the genre. I liked Yola, and although some of her actions seemed pretty unreasonable and inconsistent, she is fully aware of it. As we’re inside her head, it’s easy to empathise, especially because she’s put in pretty impossible situations at times, and it’s difficult to imagine what else she could do. I also liked most of the members of her family, and yes, Aunt Celia and Aunt Milagros truly shine through. The female characters are more memorable than the males (other than Román and Ugly), but they are also familiar, and it’s likely that most readers would identify people they know who share characteristics with them. As is the case in all families, you might have your favourites, but there’s so much history shared that you feel for them. Yes, I’ll miss the Palacios.

The writing is sharp, witty, and eminently quotable. It flows well and although I know many readers don’t like first-person narratives, I enjoyed this one, and also the fragments from Aunt Celia’s memoirs. There are words and expressions in Spanish (I’m not from Venezuela, but the Spanish terms are well-written, and the research has paid up), but they do not impede the understanding of the text, and rather add to the atmosphere and the realism of the piece. I have highlighted the text extensively, but I’ll try to share a few examples of the writing. As usual, I’d recommend prospective readers to check a sample first, to see if it suits their taste. (Some reviewers did not like the humorous tone when dealing with such serious matters, but I felt that was one of the strong points of the novel).

Her wit was as lethal as a syringe of cyanide.”

Only a real political genius like him, with his communist sympathies despite everything we’d been through in Caracas, would name his kid after Fidel Castro.”

Our immigrant story is as classic and unchanging as any Hans Christian Andersen fairytale —the tale of the illegal refugees who risked it all to live like cockroaches, hiding in the dank cracks of an unknown society where they hope no one will find them, antennae forever twitching, listening for the heavy boot of National Security, only to discover that the strange new place they call home has all the ugliness of the world they left behind, except worse, because here you’re stripped of rights, dignity, personhood.”

’Life is a big piece of sugarcane’. ‘Sugarcane?’ ‘Yes, a maldito sugarcane! You have to bite down hard and suck as much sweetness out of it as you can.’”

The ending is open to interpretation and to what we have learned and think about Yola. I liked it, as I liked the whole book, and whichever choice readers think she goes for, it is certain to be hopeful and positive (although this being Yola, not without a touch of irony and ambivalence). Considering what happens during the book, the ending is perhaps too neat, but this is a comedy so it goes with the territory, and I think most readers will enjoy it.

This is a great debut novel, which deals in serious topics using a comedic register that in my opinion works very well but might not suit everybody. The characters are wonderful, if somewhat cartoonish at times, and the family Palacios is likely to stay with readers for a long time. I recommend this novel to people interest in finding new authors, and who don’t mind the use of dark comedy to discuss important issues. I highly recommend this book and I am looking forward to the next novel by the author.

Thanks to NetGalley, the publisher and the author for this fabulous novel, thanks to all of you for reading, and remember to like, share, comment, click (the book is published on the 14th of May 2020, so you might need to wait a couple of days to get it if you read this on the day it goes live), review, and always keep smiling!

Categories
Book review Book reviews

#Bookreview A LONG PETAL OF THE SEA: A Novel by Isabel Allende (@isabelallende) (@BloomsburyBooks) Fantastic. Unforgettable.

Hi all:

I bring you a book by a favourite author of mine that I had not read for a very long time. It’s a fabulous book, although the English version won’t be available until January. It has been out in Spanish for several months, but my review is of the English version, and it’s available for preorder. Pete, I think you’d enjoy this one.

Cover of A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende
A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende, English version

A Long Petal of the Sea: A Novel by Isabel Allende

From the New York Times bestselling author of The House of the Spirits, this epic novel spanning decades and crossing continents follows two young people as they flee the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War in search of a place to call home.

In the late 1930s, civil war grips Spain. When General Franco and his Fascists succeed in overthrowing the government, hundreds of thousands are forced to flee in a treacherous journey over the mountains to the French border. Among them is Roser, a pregnant young widow, who finds her life intertwined with that of Victor Dalmau, an army doctor and the brother of her deceased love. In order to survive, the two must unite in a marriage neither of them desires.

Together with two thousand other refugees, they embark on the SS Winnipeg, a ship chartered by the poet Pablo Neruda, to Chile: “the long petal of sea and wine and snow.” As unlikely partners, they embrace exile as the rest of Europe erupts in world war. Starting over on a new continent, their trials are just beginning, and over the course of their lives, they will face trial after trial. But they will also find joy as they patiently await the day when they will be exiles no more. Through it all, their hope of returning to Spain keeps them going. Destined to witness the battle between freedom and repression as it plays out across the world, Roser and Victor will find that home might have been closer than they thought all along.

A masterful work of historical fiction about hope, exile, and belonging, A Long Petal of the Sea shows Isabel Allende at the height of her powers.

Advance praise for A Long Petal of the Sea

“Both an intimate look at the relationship between one man and one woman and an epic story of love, war, family, and the search for home, this gorgeous novel, like all the best novels, transports the reader to another time and place, and also sheds light on the way we live now. Isabel Allende is a legend and this might be her finest book yet.”—J. Courtney Sullivan, author of Saints for All Occasions

“This is a novel not just for those of us who have been Allende fans for decades, but also for those who are brand-new to her work: What a joy it must be to come upon Allende for the first time. She knows that all stories are love stories, and the greatest love stories are told by time.”—Colum McCann, National Book Award–winning author of Let the Great World Spin

Links:

https://www.amazon.com/Long-Petal-Sea-Novel-ebook/dp/B07R9WKFRF/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Long-Petal-Sea-Isabel-Allende/dp/1526615908/

https://www.amazon.es/Long-Petal-Sea-Novel-ebook/dp/B07R9WKFRF/

Author Isabel Allende
Author Isabel Allende

About the author:

Born in Peru and raised in Chile, Isabel Allende is the author of eight novels, including, most recently, Zorro, Portrait in Sepia, and Daughter of Fortune. She has also written a collection of stories; three memoirs, including My Invented Country and Paula; and a trilogy of children’s novels. Her books have been translated into more than twenty-seven languages and have become bestsellers across four continents. In 2004 she was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Isabel Allende lives in California.

Here the cover of the Spanish version

My review: 

Thanks to NetGalley and to Bloomsbury Publishing for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

I have long been a fan of Isabel Allende’s novels, although I haven’t read any of her recent books, despite my best intentions. I read many of her early novels, in Spanish, and I enjoyed her take on Magic Realism, which I found inspiring. When I saw this novel, which combined Allende’s writing with a historical subject close to my heart (I’m from Barcelona, like the protagonist of the novel, and some of my relatives lived experiences quite similar to those Victor goes through), I had to read it. And although it is a very different reading experience from that of The House of the Spirits, I enjoyed it enormously.

This novel is the story of Victor Dalmau, whom we meet at a very difficult moment, during the Spanish Civil War. He was studying Medicine and helps look after the wounded in battle, while his younger brother, Guillem, fights for the Republic. Told in the third person, mostly from Victor’s point of view (there is a fragment where the novel deviates from that, but there is a good reason for it), the book follows his life pretty closely and in chronological order, although not all periods of his life are shared in the same detail. We learn about his family, his parents, Roser (his brother’s girlfriend and one of the students of Victor’s father, a musician), and hear first-hand of his experiences during the war, the retreat (“la retirada”), and the problems a huge number of Spaniards who escaped to France had to face once there.

Pablo Neruda, the Chilean poet, is fundamental to the story, not only because he chartered the SS Winnipeg that took many Spaniards (around two thousand) to Chile, escaping from Franco’s regime and the French camps, but also because he personally appears in the novel and each chapter is introduced by one of his poems. In fact, the title of the book also comes from one of his poems, and it is a descriptive metaphor of the country, Chile, that welcomed the refugees with open arms. The story also follows Victor’s later adventures, his studies and work as a cardiologist, Roser’s works as a musician and her creation of an orchestra, and the historical and political upheavals they have to confront, with further displacements and persecution. What is to be an emigrant, how different people adapt to different realities and countries (Victor and Roser are pretty different in this respect), and also the invaluable contribution those very same immigrants make to the very fabric of the country that takes them in, are threads that run through the whole novel.

This is my first experience of reading Allende’s work in English, and I thought the translation was excellent. The language is both functional and beautiful, capturing the emotions of the characters, and vividly portraying their experiences, at times harrowing and at others uplifting. I was very touched by the narrative, and although that might be in part due to my personal connection to the material (not only the historical aspect, but also the experience of life in a different country) , the effect was not limited to the parts of the story I was familiar with. The adventures of Victor and Roser in Chile, Allende’s government (of course, Salvador Allende was Isabel’s uncle), and the military coup, further tested their endurance and made them start again in Venezuela. Added to the larger historical events, we have a story of love, family, and displacement, which will resonate with many readers, even if they are not familiar with the particular historical and geographical setting. Circumstances might change, but the problems are universal.

The author talks about the genesis of the book in a note at the beginning of the book and explains it in more detail in the acknowledgements at the end. Although this is a novel, it is based on real accounts, and its main character was inspired by another Victor, Victor Pey, who lived to be 103, and who experienced many of the trials and tribulations we read about. Allende creates a catalogue of varied characters, complex and credible, and mixes historical figures with fictional ones seamlessly. Victor is a quiet man, hard-working, who prefers action to idle talk, and whose mission in life seems to be to help others. He is a survivor who can be naïve about the consequences of his actions and about the motivations of others, but he always expects the best of others and hopes against hope. Roser, his wife, is a fabulous character, a strong woman who keeps going no matter what, and their relationship evolves through the book, never getting old and with plenty of surprises. There are plenty of memorable characters in the book, some that play a larger part than others, and some that keep popping up at regular intervals as time passes. I was intrigued by the Solan family, fascinated by Juana, their lifelong servant, and also appreciated the small details that add a human touch to the historical figures, Pablo Neruda in particular.

I loved the writing style, poetic and lyrical at times, despite dealing in some very harsh topics. The flow varies, and some historical periods are described in more detail than others, as happens in memoirs. I’ve read comments of readers who say there is too much telling in this novel. There is a fair amount of telling, that is true, by the very nature of the story, but it suits the personality of the protagonist, and to be honest, I cried with the story as it is. I’m not sure I would have managed to read it if it were even more emotional. (I smiled as well, and it is a hopeful story overall, but it did touch me deeply).

I have highlighted many passages, and it’s difficult to choose one or two, but I decided to give it a try.

Here Victor Dalmau observes the work of the female volunteers looking after injured soldiers in the Spanish Civil War:

Volunteer women would moisten their lips, whisper to them, and comfort them as if they were their own children, in the knowledge that somewhere else, another woman might be cradling their own son or brother.

If you are very sensitive, you might want to look away now:

This was to be his most stubborn, persistent memory of the war: that fifteen- or sixteen-year-old boy, still smooth-cheeked, filthy with the dirt of battle and dried blood, laid out on a stretcher with his heart exposed to the air.

And I had to include one from Pablo Neruda, quoted here in chapter 2.

Nothing, not even victory,

Can wipe away the terrible hole of blood.

I love this novel, which I recommend to readers of historical fiction, particularly those interested in the Spanish Civil War and/or the history of Chile, to fans of Isabel Allende, and also to those who’ve never read her before, but are looking for a compelling story, masterfully written, with a memorable cast of characters and a story with many parallels to recent events. I attended a conference about la Retirada (the retreat of around 500000 Spaniards, both military and civilians, escaping to France from Spain at the end of the Civil War, in February 1939) on its 80th anniversary earlier this year, and looking at the pictures, it gave us all pause, because if we just changed the background of the photographs and the clothes, we could have been watching the news. Like those images, this is a novel that will stay with me. I might be biased but that’s my prerogative and I can’t recommend it enough.

Thanks very much to Netgalley, the publisher, the author and translator for this fabulous book, thanks to all of you for reading, and if you’ve enjoyed it, share it around, but whatever you think, always keep smiling. 

Categories
Autores Invitados Novedades literarias

#Autorinvitado Franklin Díaz Lárez (@franklindiazl) Ficción, realidad y mucho más.

Hola a todos:

Como ya sabéis, los viernes toca autor invitado y/o novedad literaria. Conocí al autor Franklin Díaz Laredo en Twitter y gracias a otros compañeros autores. Me comentó que había publicado un nuevo libro. Sabía que no había visitado mi blog aún, y cuando me puse a investigar me di cuenta de que tiene muchas obras publicada, aunque algunas solo en formato papel. De momento, decidí empezar por las más recientes y seguir explorando. Pero primero, dejadme que os presente al autor.

Autor Franklin Díaz Laredo
Autor Franklin Díaz Lárez

Franklin A. Díaz Lárez nació en Venezuela el 26 de Febrero de 1.967. Reside en España desde el año 2.002
Es abogado, especialista en docencia universitaria, especialista en inmigración a la Unión Europea y escritor.
Ha escrito y publicado en Amazon los libros:
* Las baladas del cielo
* El último prefecto
* La casa del columpio
* Ramny y la savia de amor
* Crónica de un suicidio
* El aroma del mastranto
* Susurros de amor (Serie de cuatro relatos romántico eróticos: PRIMERO: “Eternamente, Ivonne”, SEGUNDO: “Adelaida, guardiana de mi inocencia”, TERCERO: “Un poco loca”, CUARTO: “Aquellos dulces días de calor”)
* El gestor inmobiliario (Fundamentos teóricos)
* El gestor inmobiliario (Contratos y formularios)
* La gestión inmobiliaria – Teoría y práctica del mundo de los negocios inmobiliarios
* Quiero publicar mi libro.
* Autopublicación en papel (Createspace – Lulú – Bubok)
* Relatos de la pasión y del corazón
* Siempre puedo continuar
* Guía práctica del camarero
Blog:
http://diazfranklin.wordpress.com

Página de autor en Amazon:

http://amzn.to/1XzHXfZ

Y tres de sus libros:

El último prefecto

El último prefecto de Franklin Díaz Lárez

El 31 de diciembre del año 2.001, quedaron suprimidas definitivamente las prefecturas de Venezuela. Unas instituciones reguladas por una ley inconstitucional, injusta e inmoral; la ley de vagos y maleantes. Un cuerpo normativo que facultaba a los prefectos a imponer arrestos y detenciones de hasta setenta y dos horas, o internamiento indefinido en aberrantes colonias de reclusión sin orden judicial previa.
Dicha ley había sido heredada de la última dictadura que hubo en Venezuela; la del General Marcos Pérez Jiménez, y a su vez había sido copiada, casi al calco, de otra similar que se aplicaba en España en la época de la dictadura franquista.
En ella se consideraba que todos los que no tuviesen oficio conocido podían ser considerados como vagos o maleantes, y ser objeto de sanción por parte de los prefectos. Incluso a los homosexuales se les atribuía tal consideración.
Inexplicablemente, aun y cuando los fundamentos jurídicos y éticos de aquella ley rayaban en lo absurdo, mantenía su vigencia plena, y los funcionarios encargados de su aplicación no estaban facultados para negarse a ejecutarla. Mientras mantuviera su vigencia, los prefectos estaban obligados a acatarla, cumplirla y hacerla cumplir.
Por ventura o por desgracia, el destino me eligió para ser uno de aquellos últimos prefectos.
Estas son las memorias de algunos de los casos más sorprendentes con los que tuve que lidiar.

http://amzn.to/1XzHXg1

http://amzn.to/1XzHYk5

http://bit.ly/1XzHYk7

Susurros de amor

Susurros de amor de Franklin Díaz Lárez

Un libro que contiene cuatro relatos romántico – eróticos.
ETERNAMENTE, IVONNE
Narra la historia de una relación amorosa entre un joven que a sus 17 años se inicia en el mundo laboral, y una atractiva chica que para entonces cuenta con la edad de 23. Seis años mayor que él.
Después de pasar por diversos obstáculos, ambos inician una profunda relación basada principalmente en una intensa y continua actividad sexual.
Muy lejos está el joven de sospechar siquiera el final que le espera.
ADELAIDA; GUARDIANA DE MI INOCENCIA
Un relato en el que se cuenta la forma como un joven de 15 años pierde su virginidad con Adelaida, la chica de servicio de su casa, que le aventaja en 10 años de edad. Una relación que marcará las vidas de ambos en un “antes” y un “después”.
UN POCO LOCA
Narra los encuentros de una joven psicóloga recién egresada de la universidad, con su paciente; un primo lejano suyo aquejado por un fuerte cuadro de ansiedad.
En las visitas, surgirá entre ambos una atracción mayor de la que comúnmente se espera entre el paciente y su médico, y que les llevará a desafiar y poner a prueba los límites de la ética profesional.
AQUELLOS DULCES DÍAS DE CALOR
Francisco y Carmen, dos jóvenes empleados de una entidad bancaria, comienzan a estudiar juntos la carrera de derecho, aunque con ímpetus y motivaciones muy diferentes. A ella todo le da igual, pone muy poco de su parte. Él, por el contrario, se entrega con absoluta devoción.
Cercanos a la culminación del primer año académico, Carmen intentará conseguir sus objetivos formulándole a Francisco una insólita y sorprendente proposición. Su respuesta generará una cadena de situaciones inconcebibles e insólitas, y una intensa confusión de sentimientos entre ambos de los que no les será nada fácil escapar.
Un relato cargado de emociones, erotismo y descripciones elocuentes de sexo explícito.

http://amzn.to/1pxYPta

http://amzn.to/1pxYRRF

http://bit.ly/1pxYPtc

Y:

Las baladas del cielo

Las baladas del cielo de Franklin Díaz Lárez

En un país asiático, una cadena de extraños acontecimientos deja su amarga huella de desolación en cientos de personas. Se cuentan por decenas los desaparecidos sin ninguna explicación. Un misterio insólito e insospechado, del que solo muchos años después comienzan a aparecer pistas fiables.
Paralelamente, en el lado opuesto del planeta, un joven abogado enfrenta un duro choque con la realidad cuando comienza a ejercer su profesión de manera independiente. Impactado por lo que observa, decide refugiarse en otra actividad relacionada con su formación académica, sin sospechar que al hacerlo tendrá que enfrentarse a los más intrincados entresijos de sus temores, inseguridades y fantasmas del pasado que nunca le han abandonado.
Por una extraña contingencia del destino, las dos historias se cruzarán, y un desenlace impactante, que nadie es capaz sospechar, finalmente se producirá.

http://amzn.to/1pxYSoA

http://amzn.to/1pxYSoD

http://bit.ly/1pxYSoG

Y por si queréis más información sobre él, la gran autora Blanca Miosi lo tuvo de invitado en su programa radiofónico, y lo podéis escuchar aquí:

Muchas gracias a Franklin Díaz Lárez por sus libros y a Blanca Miosi por compartir su entrevista, gracias a vosotros por leer (y escuchar), y si os ha interesado, ya sabéis, dadle al me gusta, comentad, compartid y haced CLIC!

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