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#Bookreview Deadlines on the Front Line: Travels with a Veteran War Correspondent by Paul Moorcraft (@penswordbooks). A chronicle of a life spent chasing the news #non-fiction

Hi all:

And now, for something totally different.

Deadlines on the Front Line: Travels with a Veteran War Correspondent  by Paul Moorcraft
Deadlines on the Front Line: Travels with a Veteran War Correspondent
by Paul Moorcraft

Deadlines on the Front Line: Travels with a Veteran War Correspondent by Paul Moorcraft.

The author of this gritty memoir has lived life to the full and fortunately has the ability to recall his experiences in a graphic and entertaining manner.

As a war correspondent and paramilitary policeman, Moorcraft was a magnet for drama and action. His descriptions of sometimes tragic and often hilarious escapades in war torn countries literally from A (Afghanistan) to Z (Zimbabwe) are self-effacingly entertaining. His light-hearted approach disguises a thoroughly perceptive and analytical mind. The reader will never be bored while accompanying Moorcraft reporting on wars in over thirty combat zones in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. This is his book of hazardous travels to strange, often little-known places meeting even stranger people who were often all too keen to lock him up or try and kill him.

Deadlines on the Frontline is a delightful and invigorating read which offers an intelligent insight into the turbulent world of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

https://www.amazon.com/Deadlines-Front-Line-Travels-Correspondent/dp/1526739496/

https://www.amazon.es/Deadlines-Front-Line-Travels-Correspondent-ebook/dp/B07QGKH1B6/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deadlines-Front-Line-Travels-Correspondent-ebook/dp/B07QGKH1B6/

https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Deadlines-on-the-Front-Line-Hardback/p/15475

About the author:

Professor Paul Moorcraft is a prolific author and war correspondent who served in the Rhodesian/Zimbabwean Police and worked closely with the British armed forces for many years. His book The Rhodesian War (Pen and Sword 2008) has been a huge success. He lives in the Surrey Hills, near Guildford.

Paul Moorcraft’s book ‘The Jihadist Threat’ was one of six military titles shortlisted for the British Army Military Book of the Year 2016.

My review:

Thanks to Rosie Croft from Pen & Sword for sending me an early hardback copy of this book, which I freely chose to review.

I have become interested in the world of the press and reporters of recent, and when I read the information about this book, I had to check it out.

This book is part memoir/part chronicle of Moorcraft’s life as a war correspondent, but it is not only about that, as he does talk in detail about periods of his life dedicated to teaching (for example in Australia and New Zealand) and also about a variety of other projects he took on, like creating documentaries of all kinds, mostly following his instincts and his interests. If he was living in a particular country, and he heard about something going on in a neighbouring one, he’d always manage to find a reason to be there. He knew how to sell his ideas and how to get news agencies and broadcasters interested, for good reason, as he is an engaging and knowledgeable reporter, with a knack for meeting all kinds of people and getting into difficult places. Some of the stories of his trips to meet fighters, guerrilla leaders, and his stays at dangerous places at particularly risky times make for scary reading, as it’s impossible not to think what we would have felt like in that situation. I don’t think many of us would have dared to try some of the stunts he pulls, and it is easy to see why he wonders about the nature of courage in his conclusion. Courage might take many forms, but there is little doubt that what he and many of his colleagues did, and do still, takes courage and something we might call a true vocation or “calling”. And yes, perhaps some form of “madness”.

I’ve read a review that says the author has covered all countries almost from A to Z (and yes, Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and many in between, all around Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania, some which no longer exist as well) and that is true. He writes well, extremely well, and he is far from politically correct or careful when it comes to stating his opinions, that are deeply personal and do not ever purport to be neutral or even fair. Some of his views will be unpopular with some readers (I must admit I do not share his point of view on many subjects), but he narrates his own experiences candidly, he does not take himself too seriously, being as critical of himself as he is of the rest of the people who make an appearance in this book, and he humbly acknowledges that his opinion might be biased and one-sided.  Although his adventures reminded me of James Bond at times (a character I must confess I’ve never been fond of), he shows empathy and a deep concern for those in a position of weakness and powerlessness, suffering due to the poor decisions of those who are supposed to protect them. He is self-deprecating at times, and there are plenty of jokes and humour, very British humour (or Welsh, although he acknowledges that for someone who deeply loves Wales, he has spent most of his life away) in the book. There are also many photographs, maps, a timeline, and great observations of places, countries, and ways of life that, in some cases, have totally disappeared (his early chapters on Africa and South-Africa I found particularly illuminating in this respect).

I recommend this book to people interested in how being a war correspondent and a reporter has changed over the recent years, to those who want to read a personal account of what it was like to live in some of the most conflict-ridden areas in the world from the early 1970s until recently, and to people interested in life as a university professor in different countries over the years. The author has written many other books, fiction and non-fiction, and if readers enjoy his writing, there’s plenty more to explore.

As an example of his style, I’ll leave you with his closing reflections:

I still plan a few more comebacks, just like the guy who grew up in the same Pontypridd street where my mother’s family lived: Tom Jones. I have accepted that instead of always wondering why I inevitably sat next to the nutter on the bus, train or plane, I realize that people often thought I was the nutter. I spent my working life at places such as Sandhurst or Staff College assuming I was the only sane man in the lunatic asylum. I finally realized that they couldn’t all be wrong.

Thanks to Rosie and to the author, thanks to all of you for reading, and remember to share if you enjoy it and to always keep reading and smiling!

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Book review Book reviews

#Bookreview THE TUDOR CROWN by Joanna Hickson (@joannahickson) #historicalfiction #TheTudorCrown Great female narrator and a must-read for lovers of all things Tudor

Hi all:

Today I bring you a book that I’m sure many of you will be interested in.

Book review. The Tudor Crown by Joanna Hickson
The Tudor Crown by Joanna Hickson

The Tudor Crown by Joanna Hickson

She’ll betray her King to crown her son.

‘An intriguing tale, told with confidence’ The Times

When Edward of York takes back the English crown, the Wars of the Roses scatter the Lancastrian nobility and young Henry Tudor, with a strong claim to the throne, is forced into exile.

Recently widowed and vulnerable, his mother, Lady Margaret Beaufort, forges an uncomfortable alliance with Edward’s queen, Elizabeth Woodville. Swearing an oath of allegiance to York, Margaret agrees to marry the king’s shrewdest courtier, Lord Stanley. But can she tread the precarious line between duty to her husband, loyalty to her son, and her obligation to God and the king?

When tragedy befalls Edward’s reign, Richard of York’s ruthless actions fire the ambition of mother and son. As their destinies converge each of them will be exposed to betrayal and treachery and in their gruelling bid for the Tudor crown, both must be prepared to pay the ultimate price…

Links:

https://www.amazon.com/Tudor-Crown-Joanna-Hickson-ebook/dp/B072S4MJ4Z/

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tudor-Crown-Joanna-Hickson-ebook/dp/B072S4MJ4Z/

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Joanna Hickson:

‘A great tale… the golden thread that led to the crown of England’ Conn Iggulden

‘An intriguing tale, told with confidence’ The Times

‘Rich and Warm’ Sunday Express

‘Colourful and vivid’ Elizabeth Chadwick

‘A big-hearted and engrossing novel.’ Elizabeth Freemantle

‘Thoroughly engrossing’ The Lady

A gripping and emotional story’ Woman

‘A bewitching first novel…alive with historical detail’ Good Housekeeping

‘An enthralling blend of fact and fiction, drama and danger, passion and politics’ Lancashire Evening Post

Author Joanna Hickson
Author Joanna Hickson

About the author:

Joanna Hickson was born in England but spent her early childhood in Australia, returning at thirteen to explore her first castle and develop a fascination with medieval history. She also discovered a love of words in all their guises, took a degree in Politics and English and a career in journalism, spending twenty-five years in the BBC producing and presenting News and Arts programmes for TV and Radio. Joanna is now writing fiction set in the period she fell in love with as a child, indulging her passion for bringing the past to life. She is married, lives in an old farmhouse near Bath and has a large extended family living on both sides of the world. She welcomes contact on Facebook (Joanna Hickson) and Twitter (@joannahickson) but warns that she spends a lot of time in the fifteenth century!

https://www.amazon.com/Joanna-Hickson/e/B0034OFIXS/

My review:

Thanks to NetGalley and to Harper Collins UK for providing me an ARC copy of this novel that I freely chose to review.

I must start by saying that although I’ve been reading more historical fiction recently, I am not an expert on the subject, and I know a bit more about other historical periods than about the rise to power of Henry VII of England. I was familiar with the bare facts and, like many people, knew of Richard III through Shakespeare’s play. So, please take my comments about historical accuracy with a pinch of salt (I might be totally wrong!).

I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. I had not read any of Joanna Hickson’s previous books but thought this would be an opportunity to familiarise myself with the period and to discover her writing. The book follows the adventures of Henry Tudor, whom we meet as a youth, as he escapes England with his uncle Jasper Owen, and also his mother’s, Lady Margaret Beaufort, who is left in the unenviable position of being widowed and a known supporter of the losing side (the House of Lancaster) in the new court of Edward IV (of the House of York). The chapters, written in first person from the points of view of the two protagonists, alternate as required by the action (at times we might have several chapters from Margaret’s point of view, and towards the end, when Henry returns to England, while his mother is confined to her husband’s household, we have several from his point of view), and we also have access to their epistolary interaction (as many years passed before they set eyes on each other).

To begin with I was overwhelmed by the large cast of characters, some with pretty complex titles and similar names, but the book offers a Family Tree and a Map at the beginning, that allow us to follow some of the intricacies of the relationships and to better understand the movements of the characters, and a glossary at the end, that includes definitions of some of the historical terms in use and others relevant to the story (some French and Welsh words that are introduced in the action). (Those who access the story in e-book format should be able to find most of the terms in the dictionary included with the e-reader). Do not be put off by talk of historical terms, as the language used in the story, although not jarringly modern or inadequate to the times, is easy to follow, flows well and feels completely natural to the setting and the situation.

As for the characters… I liked Margaret from the very beginning. Even though her circumstances are miles and centuries apart from most of us, it is easy to empathise with a woman who has lost her husband, is separated from her son, and has to make difficult decisions in order to survive and to further the cause of her son. She is intelligent, astute, determined, but also caring, generous, and kind-hearted. She takes on the children of noblemen and women who have lost their lives in the war or fallen on hard times (perhaps as a way of compensating for the loss of her son), and she is presented as a woman particularly attuned to the difficulties and tragedies other women are faced with. She is a staunch supporter of her son, schemes and puts herself at great risk, at times, to try and further his cause.

I found the early chapters from Henry’s point of view, less interesting. Although he finds himself in dire situations, he is too young to fully understand what is happening, and he gets side-tracked at times and behaves like a boy his age, no matter what fate might have in store for him. This is as it should be and shows the skill of the writer, who presents Henry as somebody aware of his position but also a young boy with much to learn, not only about becoming a king but also about life in general. The book is, in part, his coming-of-age story (including a romance, which the author explains in her note at the end, she made up), but as he grows, he comes into his own and ends up being the one to drive the action. Whatever our opinion of the historical events of the time, his life in exile, always at risk of assassination due to his bloodline, the early loss of his father and the forced separation from his mother make him another character easy to side with. The fact that we see the story from his point of view, and have no insight into Richard III or his actions (other than third-hand through comments and gossip from others) adds to our enjoyment of the story as it is told, although I found that, like Margaret, we come to appreciate some of the members of the York House (Edward IV, his wife, and his daughter, Elizabeth of York) and, like the country, we see that politics and alliances can be difficult to fathom and understand without full knowledge of the circumstances.

There are enigmatic characters (Margaret’s husband, Lord Stanley, is fascinating and plays his cards very well, although he is not heroic in the standard sense), and the novel offers us a good sense of the complexity of the historical period, of what passed for diplomacy at the time (that might include marrying somebody to further one’s claims to land, power, and titles), and of how easily somebody’s luck can turn. Survival was complicated in such a period, no matter who you were (in fact, it might be more difficult if you were of royal blood), and knowing how to present yourself and who to choose as your ally could be (and often was) a matter of life or death.

The author includes recent discoveries (like Richard III’s body being unearthed from a Leicester’s car park) and research to bring to life the Battle of Bosworth (or Redemore Battle, if we were trying to be more precise. You might enjoy this post if you are interested in the battle). The scene is set in detail and she manages to convey the brutality of it and the tactical elements. Richard III’s determination also comes through, and no matter what we might think of him as a person, it seems he was a brave and determined fighter.

The ending, which is satisfying (of course, not surprising), leaves us with Henry waiting to be crowned and talking about his marriage, after having finally been reunited with his mother. In her note, the author tells us she plans more books with Margaret as a character, and she explains her first-hand research (including visiting some of the Bretton and French castles where Henry spent his youth, and the Battle of Bosworth Heritage site, which sounds like a must for anybody interested in the topic), and the books and sources she has accessed. She also explains which liberties she took with the story and how much she made up (very little is known of Henry’s life in France), and it did not sound excessive, considering this is not intended as a history book but as a novel.

In sum, I enjoyed learning more about this historical period; I felt the first-person narration made it easier to get invested in the fates of the characters and enjoyed the mixture of politics and action. I recommend it to people interested in this historical period, lovers of historical fiction and all things Tudor, and to fans of the author. I will keep my eye on future releases and will check her other books.

Thanks to NetGalley and Harper Collins UK for the book, thanks to all of you for reading, and remember to like, share, comment, click, review, and to always keep SMILING!

Categories
New books

#Newbook THE BODY IN THE SNOW by Christoph Fischer (@CFFBooks) A cozy Welsh mystery with a fabulous setting and characters.

Hi all:

It’s Friday and time for a new book. Today I had to bring you a new book by a great writer and blogger, Christoph Fischer. He not only writes in many genres (yes, there are a few of us) but is a generous blogger, reviews tonnes of books and features interviews and news about other writers, advice and charitable causes. He’s an all round great guy, and now he’s trying his hand writing a cozy mystery. And I, for one, I’m very intrigued.

The Body in the Snow by Christoph Fischer
The Body in the Snow by Christoph Fischer

THE BODY IN THE SNOW – A BEBE BOLLINGER MURDER MYSTERY:

Fading celebrity Bebe Bollinger is on the wrong side of fifty and dreaming of a return to the limelight. When a TV show offers the chance of a comeback, Bebe grabs it with both hands – not even a lazy agent, her embarrassing daughter, irritating neighbours or a catastrophic snowfall will derail her moment of glory. But when a body is found in her sleepy Welsh hamlet, scandal threatens.
Detective Sergeant Beth Cooper has a string of unsolved cases to her name. Her girlfriend left her and she’s a fish out of water in rural West Wales. Things couldn’t get much worse – until the case of the Body in The Snow lands in her lap.

Can Beth solve the case and save her career and can Bebe make her comeback?  All will be revealed in this light-hearted, cosy murder mystery by best-selling and award-winning historical and crime fiction novelist Christoph Fischer.

Here are the links to preorder it:

The Body in the Snow” is now available as e-book on Amazon on pre-order via these links:

http://smarturl.it/BodyInTheSnowBB

http://bookShow.me/B01LVYRI9L

I know the book is due on the 24th, so if you’re reading this on the date of publication, that’s tomorrow, so you won’t have to wait long. You might be still in time to get one of the ARC copies if you’re desperate to read it, but I also recommend you that you check the series of posts the author has been sharing on his blog about how the novel came to be. They are packed with information and will make you want to read it even more.

Here are a few links:

Some background for “The Body in the Snow (A Bebe Bollinger Murder Mystery)”

Welsh Wednesdays: Wales as the setting for “The Body in the Snow (A Bebe Bollinger Murder Mystery)”

Biography Excerpt: Bebe Bollinger, the star of “The Body In the Snow” #cozymystery #murder #Wales #Eurovision

 

Thanks to Christoph for bringing us his new book, thanks to all of you for reading, and remember to like, share, comment, and CLICK! And of course, don’t forget to check the other posts on the author’s website. He has tonnes of reviews, features about books and authors. 

Categories
Book reviews Rosie's Book Review Team

#RBRT TRUST ME I LIE by Louise Marley (@LouiseMarley) Mysteries, fairy tales, false identities and an unlikely couple. #TuesdayBookBlog

Hi all:

As you know August is #AugustReviews month and I decided to set an example by bringing you a review of a book I’ve just read. I’ve read it as part of Rosie’s Book Review Team and I’m thankful to her and all the members of the team for the great books are recommendations. And without further ado…

Trust Me I Lie by Louise Marley
Trust Me I Lie by Louise Marley

Book Title: Trust Me I Lie

Author: Louise Marley

Pages: 350 pages

Genres: Murder Mystery, Suspense, Romance, Humour

Publication Date: 20th June 2016

 

Trust Me I Lie

 

When Milla Graham arrives in the picture-perfect village of Buckley she tells everyone she’s investigating the murder of her mother, who died eighteen years ago. But there’s already one Milla Graham buried in the churchyard and another about to be found dead in the derelict family mansion.

 

Obviously she’s lying.

 

Detective Inspector Ben Taylor has no life outside the police force. Even his own colleagues think he’s a boring stick-in-the-mud. But now he’s met Milla and his safe, comfortable life has been turned upside down. She’s crashed his car, emptied his wallet and is about to get him fired.

 

He knows she’s a liar because she cheerfully told him so.

 

Unless she’s lying about that too …

And now that you’re utterly intrigued, my review:

Mysteries, fairy tales, false identities and an unlikely couple.

I am writing this review as part of Rosie’s Book Review Team. Thanks to the author for providing me a free copy of the novel in exchange for an unbiased review and to Rosie for the opportunity.

I try to read in a variety of genres (it’s good to keep the brain on its toes, so to speak, and since I joined Rosie’s team I’ve been tempted by the varied offerings of titles I might not have come across otherwise). But whilst for some genres I have to prepare myself and be in the mood, mysteries and thrillers I am able to read in most circumstances.

I liked the title of the novel (I don’t like liars, but an honest liar… well, I prefer that to people who swear blindly they’re telling the truth when it’s obvious they are not) and when I read it was set in the UK and it involved a family whose business was to publish books (and pretty fancy fairy tales editions at that) I knew I had to try it. And it does deliver in spades.

The story is told in the third person from the two main characters’ points of view, Milla Graham (although if she’s really Camilla Graham or her cousin, or somebody else entirely is a big part of the puzzle), a reporter who writes features about musicians and musical events, and Ben Taylor, a detective, divorced, father of a young daughter, and a man always on a mission to rescue somebody (especially damsels in distress, even if they don’t want to be rescued). There are other fragments, in italics, also in the third person, that narrate the event at the heart of the mystery (the night when the Graham’s old house burned down and three children and their mother died), that took place eighteen years before the rest of the novel. The point of view these other fragments are narrated from is not clear as we read them (other than it is somebody who witnessed what happened) but by the end of the novel we have a clear picture of what really happened (although we will have been tripped and wronged in our assumptions many times along the way).

Both main characters are likeable in different ways. Ben is handsome, honest and a good guy, who, as many female characters tell him, seems to suffer from rescue fantasies. He lives in a chocolate box cottage and he meets the other protagonist in a traumatic manner (he runs her over) in the first chapter. His car ends up in a ditch and as he has no other option he invites the stranger, a young woman, to his house. She disappears with some of his money early next morning but she does not disappear from his life. At first sight Ben appears to be a type of character we’re very familiar with (a handsome detective somewhat disillusioned by his job and with his family life in tatters) but his immediate attraction and sympathy for Milla makes him do out of character things that surprise others around him as much as himself. And we get to discover some surprising things about him too.

Milla is, without discussion, quite unique. She lives hand to mouth, has adopted the identity of the dead daughter of a very rich family (it made me think of the stories about Anastasia, the Romanov tsarina who was supposedly still alive), and it’s difficult to know what her real motivations are. Does she really believe she’s Camilla Graham? Is it all part of a hoax to get money? Is she trying to help Patrick Graham, the man who was sent to prison for the murder of his wife (and the real Camilla’s mother)? Is she the cousin of the family now trying to create confusion? Or is she a fantasist who does not know what the truth is any longer? She is determined, resourceful and will stop at nothing to reach her goal. Whatever that might be. And she is open about her lies (and does surprise herself when she doesn’t lie).

The novel features charming English towns, an old mansion that has become a gothic castle in ruins, murders staged to imitate the illustrations of famous fairy tales (with designer clothing and four poster beds also thrown in), a murderer dressed and made-up like the Mad Hatter from Alice in Wonderland, mysterious bracelets, and a world of fairy tales that turns very dark.

The main characters are fascinating and likeable and you can’t help but root for them, no matter how outrageous their behaviours. If you stopped to think about it, some of their actions definitely stretch one’s belief, but the pace is so dynamic and the story so intriguing and surprising, that you keep trying to guess what will happen next and enjoy the ride. The writing is descriptive and vivid and one feels a part of the story, or at least a very close witness of the events. Although the crimes described are horrendous, there is no gross attention to the details of the violence, no CSI-style descriptions, and although not a cozy novel, it’s not a hard-edged thriller either. Ah, and there is romance but no explicit sex scenes (or implicit even).

I had a great time reading the novel, enjoyed the satisfying ending and my only disappointment is that being a big fairy tale fan I would have loved to get my hands on the wonderful illustrated volumes of fairy tales described in the novel but unfortunately it won’t be possible. I recommend it to readers of mysteries that prefer an involved story rather than a hard-edged scientific investigation in dark, urban and grittily realistic settings. If you love quirky characters, do not hesitate and give it a try. And I’ll be keeping an eye on Louise Marley’s work for sure.

Links

AmazonUK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Trust-Me-Lie-Louise-Marley-ebook/dp/B01HDYDJZ8

Amazon USA: https://www.amazon.com/Trust-Me-Lie-Louise-Marley-ebook/dp/B01HDYDJZ8

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30715819-trust-me-i-lie

The author shared a bit of information about herself too.

Author Louise Marley
Author Louise Marley

Louise Marley

Louise Marley writes murder mysteries and romantic comedies. She lives in Wales, surrounded by fields of sheep, and has a beautiful view of Snowdon from her window.

Her first published novel was Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, which was a finalist in Poolbeg’s ‘Write a Bestseller’ competition. She has also written articles for the Irish press and short stories for UK women’s magazines such as Take a Break and My Weekly.

Her latest novel is Trust Me I Lie.

You can connect with her in

Social Media:

Website: http://www.louisemarley.co.uk/

Blog: http://www.louisemarleywrites.blogspot.co.uk/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LouiseMarley @LouiseMarley

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouiseMarleyAuthor

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/LouiseMarley

Thanks to Louise for her great novel that I thoroughly enjoyed, thanks to Rosie for creating such a great group, and thanks to you all for reading, and remember to like, share, comment and CLICK! And this month, don’t forget to REVIEW!

Categories
book promo

#Bookfair in gorgeous Wales. Don’t miss it! There will be cakes! And a question about pricing #Tuesdaybookblog

Hi all:

As I’ve been telling you recently, I’m going to my first book fair. Now it’s here! Ready or not (mostly not, but I have the books), it’s this Saturday, the 30th of April 2016 at Llandeilo. I’m an interloper (most writers have a close connection with Wales, in my case I like Wales, I’ve spent some time there and I hope to spend more in the future and… I’ll try and keep quiet) but that’s never stopped me before. Apart from books, wonderful writers who will be happy to sign, chat, read, give a few talks…, we have a writing competition for children, heavenly sweets and much, much more.

I’m very excited, not only because of the opportunity to meet readers, but also because I’ll meet some of the writers I only know through their books and their blogs. Yes!

Llandeilo Fair

Christoph Fischer, a great writer, fabulous supported of other writers and a magician at organising things, is the brains behind this fair, and he’s written such a fabulous post (including pictures of newspaper articles and everything else) that I didn’t dare to try and compete. Here, go and visit his fabulous blog to read his post, and wander around there, as there is plenty of amazing content.

Llandeilo's fair programme
Llandeilo book fair programme

I hope to have feedback for you soon, but in the meantime, I’d be grateful for any tips, suggestions and encouragement from authors and readers. I have a more specific question for authors and/or readers about pricing. I have an idea running around in my head, but not having had any experience selling paperbacks directly, how do you decide the price? 

I thought I’d share my new card with you… Thanks to Lourdes Vidal who’s risen up to the challenge.

Tarjeta 11 5x8cm

Thanks to Christoph Fischer for organising the fair, to Lourdes for her design, and to all of you for reading, liking , sharing, commenting… And if you’re anywhere near Llandeilo, do come by!

Categories
Guest author post

Guest Author: Lord David Prosser and his chronicles.

Hi all:

As you know Fridays are guest author days and recently I have been bringing you the work of some bloggers I’m very fond of but who’ve never come as authors to share their books here yet, and today I have a treat. A “real” Lord. Lord David Prosser.

Lord David Prosser
Lord David Prosser

David Prosser was born in 1951 and worked for many years as a Local Government Officer before taking early retirement due to health problems.
Finding it difficult to talk to people as a result of the illness he found himself in the situation of being housebound most of the time.In an effort to prove to himself he still had a value he started The Buthidars which is an all denomination, all colour,all creed group determined to better the world by Hugging.There is a site dedicated to this that welcomes all people who feel the World is better by forgetting our differences whilst celebrating the individuality of all peoples.
The next step was to remind the world of Edwardian style and beg the designers to recreate it in exchange for clothing that displays too much of next weeks washing. Let’s dress with some dignity !
Often heard are the words, life begins at 40. David is trying to show that life can get a kick-start at 60 too. He chose this age to sit and write his first novel, My Basetshire Diary, a fictional look at the life of the gentry.
Book 2 which is also in diary form is a prequel telling of the days between gaining his title and now, when he performed the duties of an unofficial envoy to Her Majesty.There are times when confronted by women when it’s not sure if his stiff upper lip is enough to help him get by. !
The third book, More Barsetshire Diary is a continuation of the first book. Lord David was volunteered to help the Dreaded Edna achieve an ambition. In this book he starts the job of making her more popular when Lady J volunteers his services to help Diana The Dowager Duchess of Cheam raise enough money to save her childhood home. Maybe he can do it with the help of the Toastie Tenors and the mysterious Eileen Dover.

Here his blog:

http://barsetshirediaries.wordpress.com/

My Barsetshire Diary
My Barsetshire Diary

 

My Barsetshire Diary

A fictitious look at Lord David’s day as a member of the Gentry living in a small village. Come and meet the villagers like Mellors the gardener with a past and Grizelda the housekeeper. Join us at the village fete where Edna is determined to win the jam making competition at any price. See how the formidable Lady J intends to knock Lord David into shape.
Is the famous stiff upper lip his only protection? Is anyone really this naive? The answer is a resounding YES !

http://www.amazon.com/My-Barsetshire-Diary-Diaries-Book-ebook/dp/B0054JI824/

The Queen's Envoy
The Queen’s Envoy

The Queen’s Envoy

The preview to My Barsetshire Diary in which David inherits his title and retires from work only to be asked to take on a job that his late cousin did, as an unofficial envoy to HMG. Lord David is a fish out of water travelling the world trying to solve his Government’s embarrassing little problems. With him attracting the attention of so many females, and making so many new enemies can he return to the formidable Lady J in one piece?

http://www.amazon.com/Queens-Envoy-Barsetshire-Diaries-Book-ebook/dp/B0054GP52S/

 

More Barsetshire Diary
More Barsetshire Diary

More Barsetshire Diary

The continuing saga of a member of the gentry. Lord David Prosser has to help the dreaded Edna in her campaign to become a Councillor as well as help raise funds for Diana the Dowager Duchess of Cheam to restore her beloved first home. All this while coping with life in the village, Oscar and Lady J.

http://www.amazon.com/More-Barsetshire-Diary-Diaries-Book-ebook/dp/B006UWEP3A/

Memoirs of a superior
Memoirs of a superior

Memoirs of a superior

David Prosser, Lord of Bouldnor was selected as Ghost Writer of this book because of his intimate knowledge of the subject who dictated the stories as well as dictating David’s sleeping patterns. Oscar is a Superior among Superiors and feels his stories should be told for the betterment of all cat-kind. It can be used as a training manual as well as providing entertainment. Longlegs (Humans) may well find some value in knowing how to behave with Superiors in future. David is the author of the Barsetshire Diaries in which Oscar naturally plays a starring role. The books are. My Barsetshire Diary The Queen’s Envoy More Barsetshire Diary.

http://www.amazon.com/Memoirs-Superior-Lord-David-Prosser/dp/1291523979/

Tall Animal Tales for Toddlers & Up
Tall Animal Tales for Toddlers & Up

Tall Animal Tales for Toddlers & Up

A book of slightly anarchic poems for toddlers, gigglers and up!

http://www.amazon.com/Tall-Animal-Tales-Toddlers-amp/dp/1291756825/

Thanks so much to Lord David for his sense of humour and sharing his wonderful life and wit with us, thank you so much for reading, and please, like, share, comment and of course CLICK!

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